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dc.contributor.authorMahuzier, P.E.*
dc.contributor.authorClark, Brian J.*
dc.contributor.authorBryant, S.M.*
dc.contributor.authorAltria, K.D.*
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-21T08:03:20Z
dc.date.available2009-09-21T08:03:20Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationMahuzier, P.E., Clark, B.J., Bryant, S.M. and Altria, K.D. (2001). Electrophoresis. Vol. 22, No. 17, pp. 3819-3823.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/3474
dc.descriptionNo
dc.description.abstractIn previous reports of microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC), analysis times were typically in the order of 10 min as high-ionic strength buffers were used. These buffers produced high currents which limit the voltages which can be applied, therefore, analysis times could not be reduced. The primary cause of the high-ionic strength is the relatively high concentrations of surfactants required to form the microemulsion. The surfactant concentration can be lower when using an oil with a smaller surface tension. This preliminary study showed that migration times in MEEKC can be reduced to below 1 min by using a combination of an optimum microemulsion composition, high voltage, high temperature, short capillaries by injecting via the short end, or by simultaneously applying pressure and voltage. Long injection sequences and quantitation were found to be possible with minimum buffer depletion effects.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectMicroemulsion electrokinetic chromatography
dc.subjectHigh-speed separation
dc.subjectCapillary electrophoresis
dc.titleHigh-speed microemulsion chromatography.
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repository
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/1522-2683(200109)22:17<3819
dc.openaccess.statusclosedAccess


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