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dc.contributor.authorWebster, Margaret*
dc.contributor.authorFouweather, Ian*
dc.contributor.authorBeach, Roger*
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-07T09:31:37Z
dc.date.available2009-08-07T09:31:37Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationWebster, M, Beach, R. and Fouweather, I. (2006). E-business strategy development: an FMCG sector case study. Supply Chain Management: An International Journal. Vol. 11, No. 4, pp. 353-362.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/3236
dc.descriptionNoen
dc.description.abstractPurpose ¿ This paper sets out to discuss the development of an e-business strategy by a UK soft drinks company. It is based within the Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) sector (also known as Consumer Packaged Goods), which is characterised by powerful retailers, tier-1 suppliers of industrial end-products and ingredient/raw material producers further upstream. The paper aims to examine the tensions created at tier-1 level relating to the adoption of e-business solutions for B2B activities. Design/methodology/approach ¿ The paper draws on the literature to describe the technological options for achieving e-commerce, focusing particularly on Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) and internet-mediated e-commerce. It then explores the current uptake of e-commerce, and the drivers and barriers that relate to its adoption. The theoretical issues identified are explored empirically using data gathered from a case study of Princes Soft Drinks. A detailed survey of organisations within its supply base was conducted in order to inform the development of its future e-business strategy. Findings ¿ The results of the survey indicate a lack of enthusiasm among Princes' supply chain members for the adoption of e-commerce generally and for internet-mediated e-commerce solutions in particular. Research limitations/implications ¿ The empirical survey is limited to the UK soft drinks sector and allows for the development of descriptive findings. These findings, discussed within the theoretical context of the paper, have potentially wider implications for the FMCG sector as a whole. Practical implications ¿ The work has significant implications for the development of Princes' e-business strategy, and ¿ by extrapolation ¿ for other companies operating in similar commercial environments. Originality/value ¿ The paper reports original empirical research in the commercially important FMCG sector. Its value stems in part from the examination of the supply chain tensions created at tier-1¿ between powerful e-committed retailers and e-reluctant industrial suppliers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1108/13598540610671806en
dc.subjectElectronic commerceen
dc.subjectFast moving consumer goodsen
dc.subjectInterneten
dc.subjectE-Business strategyen
dc.titleE-business strategy development: an FMCG sector case study.en
dc.status.refereedYesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen


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