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dc.contributor.authorWeinert, Friedel
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-25T13:14:08Z
dc.date.available2009-06-25T13:14:08Z
dc.date.issued2005-01-12
dc.identifier.citationWeinert F (2005) The scientist as philosopher. Berlin: Springer.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/2852
dc.descriptionNoen
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines how such fundamental notions as causality and determinism have undergone changes as a direct result of empirical discoveries. Although such notions are often regarded as metaphysical or a priori concepts, experimental discoveries at the beginning of this century¿radioactive decay, blackbody radiation and spontaneous emission-led to a direct questioning of the notions of causality and determinism. Experimental evidence suggests that these two notions must be separated. Causality and indeterminism are compatible with the behavior of quantum-mechanical systems. The argument also sheds some light on the Duhem-Quine thesis, since experimental results at the periphery of the conceptual scheme directly affect conceptions at the very core.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://www.springer.com/us/book/9783540205807en
dc.subjectScienceen
dc.subject; Philosophyen
dc.subject; Causationen
dc.subject; Quantum theoryen
dc.subject; Special theory of relativityen
dc.subject; Timeen
dc.titleThe Scientist as Philosopheren
dc.status.refereedYesen
dc.typeBooken
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen


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