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dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Greg*
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-04T10:33:34Z
dc.date.available2009-02-04T10:33:34Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationMitchell, G. (2005)¿Terrorists Prefer Diamonds¿ How predation, state collapse and insurgence have fashioned the international exploitation of Sierra Leone¿s war economy. Bradford: University of Bradford, Department of Peace Studies. Peace studies papers: Fourth series: Working paper, No. 8.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/2322
dc.description.abstractBetween 1991 and 2000, Sierra Leone experienced massive state and economic decline amidst a brutal civil war. In a country that is minerally wealthy, but ruled by a corrupt and predatory government, a `revolutionary¿ movement known as the RUF emerged, terrorising the civilian population and profiting from the unsecured diamond industry. The classic causes given for Sierra Leone¿s state collapse and consequent civil war have in large centred around the adverse effects of colonialism, civil unrest due to rampant governmental kleptocracy, and regional conflict spillover. However, the multiplicity of actors in Sierra Leone and the complexity of the environment demonstrate that the ten year civil war revolved predominantly around the country¿s highly lucrative diamonds. Indoctrinated in Qadafi¿s Libya and trained by Taylor¿s NPFL rebels in Liberia, the RUF insurgency created links through Charles Taylor to international criminals such as weapon¿s dealer Victor Bout, and international terrorists including al Qaeda. In just a few years Sierra Leone attained the dubious distinction of being one of the most globalised informal and illegal economies in the world. To the backdrop of Sierra Leone¿s collapsed state, economic vacuum and brutal civil war, and within the context of contemporary economic globalisation and an international `War on Terror¿, this paper discusses the local, regional and international levels of economic exploitation throughout the wartime period, and highlights how informal economies are inherently prone to large scale criminal predation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://www.bradford.ac.uk/acad/peace/publications/papers/psp8full.pdfen
dc.rights© 2005 University of Bradford. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.en
dc.subjectSierra Leoneen
dc.subjectCivil waren
dc.subjectRUF insurgencyen
dc.subjectDiamond industryen
dc.subjectInformal economiesen
dc.subjectCivil unresten
dc.title¿Terrorists Prefer Diamonds¿ How predation, state collapse and insurgence have fashioned the international exploitation of Sierra Leone¿s war economyen
dc.status.refereedYesen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
dc.type.versionpublished version paperen
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-18T13:29:14Z


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