• The Janus-Faced Role of Gambling Flow in Addiction Issues

      Trivedi, Rohitkumar; Teichert, T. (2017-03-01)
      Flow experience has been widely investigated in experiential activities such as sports, the performing arts, gaming and Internet usage. Most studies focus on the positive aspects of flow experience and its effect on performance. In stark contrast, gambling research focusing on the negative side of addiction lacks an in-depth investigation of gamblers’ (positive) flow encounters. This separation of research lines seems out of place given that recent research indicates connections between flow and addiction. Joining both constructs in a causal effects model helps to gain a better understanding of their relationship and its contingencies. This paper empirically investigates whether and how it is possible to observe a “Janus face” of flow with its various sub-dimensions in online gambling. Empirical data was collected from 500 online gamblers by applying a structured questionnaire with established scales. The data was analyzed with a confirmatory factor analysis and a double-hurdle model to separate casual gamblers who are unsusceptible to any addiction issues from gamblers affected by initiatory addiction issues. The findings indicate that online gambling addiction is negatively influenced by two sub-dimensions of flow experience, namely a sense of control and concentration on the task at hand, while enhanced by a transformation of time and autotelic experience.
    • A Japanese model of corporate social responsibility?: A study of website reporting

      Fukukawa, Kyoko; Moon, J. (2004)
      Japan's model of corporations has conventionally been regarded as comparatively 'society-friendly' because of such features as its corporate governance, close co-ordination with government economic policy and life-long employment. Yet this 'solidaristic' image has been unsettled by, for example, environmental failures and workplace pathologies. The paper investigates the extent and character of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Japan through analysis of CSR reporting on home websites of the top So Japanese corporations and compares this with other studies of Japanese CSR. It finds a marked growth and consolidation of CSR, particularly in environmental responsibility and, though to a lesser extent, community involvement. The paper identifies and evaluates the impacts of key CSR drivers: the developing Japanese model of business and society; government policy; and the effects of internationalisation of business.
    • Japanese Supply Chain Management

      Khojasteh, Y.; Abdi, M. Reza (2016)
    • Joining it up: multi-professional information sharing

      Richardson, Sue (2016-04-01)
      This chapter introduces four theoretical approaches to the challenge of multi-professional information sharing in public service delivery. Two of the four approaches are then described in more detail as lenses through which to explore what happens in the practice of integrated children’s services. The two approaches explored in detail are the systems approach and the approach that underpins much of this book: Etienne Wenger’s ‘communities of practice’. The focus of the chapter is on the professionals delivering the services and not primarily on the children, young people or their families who are in receipt of these services. This approach however is in no way antagonistic to the idea that it is the interests of the children and young people that must always come first when redesigning organizations, policies, procedures and guidance for practice in children’s services.
    • Just Vote No! Union-busting in the European Fast-food Industry: The Case of McDonald's

      Royle, Tony (2002)
      This paper examines the problem of effectively regulating the labour relations practices of multinational corporations. It focuses on the activities of the McDonald's Corporation in a number of European countries. The findings suggest that public and private codes of conduct have a very limited effect and that determined and well-resourced corporations can not only undermine regional forms of regulation - such as that provided by the European Union - but also, and to a considerable extent, national-level regulation. This is particularly evident in the area of independent trade union representation. Although its aim of avoiding collective bargaining and union recognition wherever possible is only partially successful, McDonald's appears to have developed a number of highly effective strategies for limiting the presence of trade unions at restaurant level, particularly in avoiding or undermining statutory works councils and union representation rights.
    • Justice judgments: Individual self-insight and between- and within-person consistency

      German, Hayley; Fortin, M.; Read, D.
      We use the method of policy capturing to address three open-ended questions regarding how people judge the fairness of events. First, do people differ in how they judge whether a situation is fair or unfair; second, are fairness judgments stable within-person; and, third, how much insight do people have into how they make fairness judgments? To investigate these questions, we used the method of policy capturing and a representative design that samples situations as well as participants. Forty-nine employees rated the global fairness of 56 performance appraisals sampled from their own organization (N = 2,744 situations), and regression methods were used to infer their judgment policy from their choices. We found that people differed greatly in how they judged fairness but used quite consistent policies across similar situations. Participants also provided self-reports of their judgment policies, and comparisons of these self-reports with actual policies revealed limited levels of self-insight.
    • Key issues for gender research in HRD: a multi-stakeholder framework for analysing gendered media constructions of women leaders

      Mavin, Sharon A.; Williams, Jannine (2015)
      Gender research can be a highly political process with significant impact, positively or negatively, on the researcher(s) and research participants. As a result there are key issues for consideration when preparing to undertake gender research in Human Resource Development (HRD). Gender research in HRD requires a mature level of researcher reflexivity in terms of personal understandings of gender; individual researcher values, philosophical positions and standpoints on gender; motivations for research; awareness of how gender research may construct researchers in their own professional settings and how research participants may respond to gender research. We contend that a process of researcher reflexivity, in critically reflecting upon and reviewing individual assumptions and standpoints, is essential before beginning gender research. Gender is a significant dimension of personal life, social relations and culture: an arena where we face difficult practical issues about justice, identity and even survival; where there is much prejudice, myth and falsehood, and where social sciences gender research is producing a relatively new form of knowledge (Connell, 2009). This chapter outlines key issues for gender researchers illustrated through research into gendered media constructions of women leaders. We introduce the importance of women leaders and gender aware learning and HRD and outline understandings of gender; diverse advances in gender research; consistency, harm, pleasure and power; participant-research relationships and the researcher’s position in gender research, by drawing upon our previous studies. We then present the key issues in practice, through our operationalization of a Multi-Stakeholder Framework for analysing gendered media constructions of women leaders. We utilize a mixed method design (Saunders, 2012) of statistical analysis of secondary data on women in senior positions in a UK region (geographies of gender); analysis of three Supplements of the Top 500 Influential Leaders via discourse analysis; a semi-structured interview with a media producer; group and individual interviews with selected aspiring and current women leaders and stages of on-going researcher reflexivity and accountability. We conclude with reflections on the constraints and possibilities of the multi-stakeholder framework approach.
    • Killing for Money and the Economic Theory of Crime

      Cameron, Samuel (2014)
      There is a large literature on the economics of crime and punishment, yet surprisingly little attention is paid to the receipt of money for crime. “Contract killing” is surprisingly neglected not only by economists but also by social scientists in general. In this paper, I look at the case not of professional gangster “hitmen” but of individuals who have found themselves in a position where they wish to have a killing carried out. This discussion does not condone the practice any more than an economic analysis of suicide is an inducement to individuals to kill themselves. To the lay reader, the cases where an individual feels the need to pay for killing may seem to be such that rationality is not a likely form of behaviour. However, the economics of crime has adopted the use of the rationality postulate as a heuristic for all types of crime.
    • Knowledge Sharing Culture in Higher Education: Critical Literature Review

      Al Kurdi, O.F.A.; Ghoneim, Ahmad; Al Roubaie, A. (2015-10-29)
      This paper reviews and analyses the literature on knowledge sharing in a university setting with the aim of identifying and understanding the determinants of knowledge sharing culture, research trends, theories, and future research opportunities for knowledge sharing in higher education institutions (HEIs). Findings suggest that there is disproportionately little knowledge sharing research in HEIs compared to the commercial sector. The review reveals that existing research on HEIs does not consider the determinants of knowledge sharing culture in a comprehensive manner. Research on knowledge sharing in commercial and HEIs in developing economies like Africa, the Middle East and South America is found to be limited. The review shows that future research should consider cultural and behavioural factors at different levels, that is, individual, national, professional teams, language issues and trust that might impact knowledge sharing practices among faculty members in HEIs in developing economies.
    • Knowledge sharing for innovation performance improvement in Micro/SMEs: An insight from the creative sector

      Tassabehji, Rana; Mishra, Jyoti L.; Dominguez-Pery, C. (2018)
      As the economy becomes more reliant on innovative, knowledge-intensive firms, understanding the interaction between knowledge and improving innovation performance is increasingly important. Despite the majority of UK businesses being micro, small or medium-sized enterprises (micro/SMEs), knowledge management research has tended to focus on large companies, and the findings may not be applicable to micro/SMEs, especially in the creative sector. Moreover, the important role played by knowledge sharing in innovation can be critical to successful performance for smaller players in the creative sector where resources are limited. Our study presents an insight from micro/SMEs operating in a highly knowledge-intensive and innovative creative industry - games/entertainment software development. Using a mixed method approach, we investigate knowledge sharing and its contribution to firm innovation performance improvements. Our findings suggest that micro/SMEs are at the forefront in the creative sector precisely because of their smaller size. Our study reveals evidence of knowledge donation but limited evidence of knowledge collection in the knowledge sharing process in micro/SMEs. We develop a knowledge sharing model for innovation performance improvement in micro/SMEs. This highlights the importance of industry context, individual knowledge and organisational size in the role of knowledge sharing in innovation performance.
    • Labour Relations in the Global Fast-Food Industry

      Royle, Tony; Towers, B. (2002)
      The fast-food industry is one of the few industries that can be described as truly global, not least in terms of employment, which is estimated at around ten million people worldwide. This edited volume is the first of its kind, providing an analysis of labour relations in this significant industry focusing on multinational corporations and large national companies in ten countries: the USA, Canada, the UK, the Netherlands, Germany, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, and Russia. The extent to which multinational enterprises impose or adapt their employment practices in differing national industrial relations systems is analysed, Results reveal that the global fast-food industry is typified by trade union exclusion, high labour turnover, unskilled work, paternalistic management regimes and work organization that allows little scope for developing workers' participation in decision-making, let alone advocating widely accepted concepts of social justice and workers' rights.
    • Labour unions

      Gall, Gregor (2014)
    • Large-scale data analysis using the Wigner function

      Earnshaw, Rae A.; Lei, Ci; Li, Jing; Mugassabi, Souad; Vourdas, Apostolos (2012)
      Large-scale data are analysed using the Wigner function. It is shown that the ‘frequency variable’ provides important information, which is lost with other techniques. The method is applied to ‘sentiment analysis’ in data from social networks and also to financial data.
    • The latent causes of rework in floating production storage and offloading projects

      Love, P.E.D.; Edwards, D.J.; Irani, Zahir; Forcada, N. (2014)
      There is growing demand for cost effective and reliable floating production systems to maximize marginal and new deepwater fields worldwide. Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessels are considered to be the most economical and viable options to meet this demand. Yet, FPSO projects are prone to significant cost and schedule growth. On average, FPSOs have been reported to experience a 20% cost growth and are delayed by six months. Overruns and delays represent uncertainties for owners, contractors and financial institutions. In-depth interviews with twenty-three practitioners about their experiences with FPSO projects revealed that rework arising from design and construction errors were major contributors to cost and schedule growth. Key latent conditions contributing to rework are classified according to people, organization and project. Using retrospective sensemaking an examination of the determinant histories in a new build and conversion FPSO that experienced rework was undertaken. The sharing of experience(s) is deemed pivotal for reducing rework in future projects, particularly through the use of communities of practice that are able to stimulate situated learning to take place. A reduction in rework will not only reduce cost and schedule growth, improve operational performance and augment safety.
    • Law Express Question and Answer: Employment Law

      Guth, Jessica; Singh, C. (2014)
      Law Express Question and Answer: Employment Law is designed to ensure you get the most marks for every answer you write by improving your understanding of what examiners are looking for, helping you to focus in on the question being asked and showing you how to make even a strong answer stand out.
    • Law Express Question and Answer: EU Law,

      Guth, Jessica; Connor, Timothy C. (2014)
      Law Express Question and Answer: EU Law is designed to ensure you get the most marks for every answer you write by improving your understanding of what examiners are looking for, helping you to focus in on the question being asked and showing you how to make even a strong answer stand out.
    • Law Express: Company Law

      Taylor, Chris W. (2015)
      The Law Express series is designed to assist students in effective exam revision by guiding users in understanding the basic concepts, the recall and application of key legislation in the exam environment.
    • Law Express: Evidence

      Taylor, Chris W. (2015)
      The Law Express series has been written to assist students in exam preparation. This title will guide users through understanding the essential concepts, and how to remember and and apply key legislation in an exam situation.