• Artificial Intelligence-based Public Healthcare Systems: G2G Knowledge-based Exchange to Enhance the Decision-making Process

      Nasseef, O.A.; Baabdullah, A.M.; Alalwan, A.A.; Lal, Banita; Dwivedi, Y.K. (2021)
      With the rapid evolution of data over the last few years, many new technologies have arisen with artificial intelligent (AI) technologies at the top. Artificial intelligence (AI), with its infinite power, holds the potential to transform patient healthcare. Given the gaps revealed by the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic in healthcare systems, this research investigates the effects of using an artificial intelligence-driven public healthcare framework to enhance the decision-making process using an extended model of Shaft and Vessey (2006) cognitive fit model in healthcare organizations in Saudi Arabia. The model was validated based on empirical data collected using an online questionnaire distributed to healthcare organizations in Saudi Arabia. The main sample participants were healthcare CEOs, senior managers/managers, doctors, nurses, and other relevant healthcare practitioners under the MoH involved in the decision-making process relating to COVID-19. The measurement model was validated using SEM analyses. Empirical results largely supported the conceptual model proposed as all research hypotheses are significantly approved. This study makes several theoretical contributions. For example, it expands the theoretical horizon of Shaft and Vessey's (2006) CFT by considering new mechanisms, such as the inclusion of G2G Knowledge-based Exchange in addition to the moderation effect of Experience-based decision-making (EDBM) for enhancing the decision-making process related to the COVID-19 pandemic. More discussion regarding research limitations and future research directions are provided as well at the end of this study.
    • Beyond planning: Strategies for successfully implementing strategic decidions.

      Miller, Susan J.; Wilson, D.C.; Hickson, David J. (2004)
      This article brings strategy back to managers and their organizations. It argues and demonstrates empirically that what managers do, and the kind of organization they lead, matter in terms of achieving stated objectives. Managerial action involves a set of activities from assessing the problem to prioritising action, and takes place within an organizational context which has two important elements for decision-making. First, organizations have an accumulated stock of experience, and the more managers can access and utilise this experience base the better. Secondly, the culture and structure of an organization may exhibit more or less readiness for the changes that decisions bring about, and contexts less ready for change pose problems for managers in the implementation of decisions. This long-term study of 55 decisions in UK firms shows that careful managerial planning does not of itself guarantee successful outcomes: the organizational context is crucial in framing actions and influencing achievement, and decisions may send a firm on a trajectory beyond the point at which it can plan with confidence. Where experience and readiness are strong, decisions achieve stated objectives¿where both are lacking, decisions tend to fail. But, as examination of two illustrative cases indicates, strength in either domain may be enough: sound experience may win out in comparatively unreceptive situations, and decisions may still succeed where experience is lacking but the organization is ready for change. The article closes with some implications for managers.
    • The long game - technological innovation and the transformation of business performance

      Matthias, Olga; Fouweather, Ian (2021-04)
      This paper brings a new perspective to knowledge by focusing on the application and exploitation of big data in two UK companies providing, respectively, online and branch retailservices. The companies innovatively exploited the data that were generated by new internet technologies to improve business performance. The findings from both case study examples show that benefits do not come simply by adopting technology, but when people think creatively to exploit the potential benefits of ITC. The conclusion drawn is that the realisation of the ‘universal benefits’ of technological innovation does occur, but not necessarily until the hype has subsided. The paper demonstrates that there is opportunity to create sustainable competitive advantage through the application of ITC although the social, technological, and human challenges of managing technology have to be appreciated and managed. These implications need to be appreciated and if true long-term advantage isto be achieved.
    • Strategic Decision-Making and Implementation in Public Organizations in the Gulf Cooperation Council: The Role of Procedural Rationality

      Al-Hashimi, K.; Weerakkody, Vishanth J.P.; Elbanna, S.; Schwarz, G. (Wiley, 2022)
      Based on Herbert Simon's conceptualization of bounded rationality, this study develops and tests an integrative model of the strategic decision-making process (SDMP) and outcomes in public organizations. The model integrates different SDMP dimensions—procedural rationality, intuition, participation, and constructive politics—and examines their impacts on the successful implementation of strategic decisions. Additionally, it analyzes the influence of implementation on the overall outcomes of strategic decisions. The model was tested with multi-source data on 170 strategic decisions collected from senior executives working in 38 public organizations in Qatar—a context in which studies on decision-making are rare. With the exception of intuition, this study shows a positive impact of all SDMP dimensions on the successful implementation and outcomes of strategic decisions. Successful implementation fully mediates the relationships between procedural rationality, participation, and constructive politics and the outcomes of strategic decision.