• CEO reputation, quality management and environmental innovation: the roles of stakeholder pressure and resource commitment

      Konadu, R.; Owusu-Agyei, S.; Lartey, T.; Danso, A.; Adomako, Samuel; Amankwah-Amoah, J. (Wiley, 2020)
      In this paper, we examine how and when chief executive offers’ (CEOs’) reputation enhances environmental innovation by considering quality management as a mediating mechanism of this relationship. In addition, we introduce stakeholder pressures (primary and secondary stakeholder pressures) as important contingencies of the relationship between CEOs’ reputation and quality management. Moreover, we test the moderating role of resource commitment on the quality management-environmental innovation relationship. We test our research model using data from a manufacturing industry sample of 217 firms from Ghana. We find that quality management mediates the relationship between reputation and environmental innovation. Moreover, the relationship between CEOs’ reputation and quality management is amplified when levels of both primary and secondary stakeholder pressures are greater. Finally, our findings show that the effect of quality management on environmental innovation is enhanced when resource commitment is greater. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.
    • Going green, going clean: Lean-green sustainability strategy and firm growth

      Lartey, T.; Yirenkyi, D.O.; Adomako, Samuel; Danso, A.; Amankwah-Amoah, J.; Alam, A. (Wiley, 2020-01)
      Despite the widespread recognition of the paybacks of “going green” and “going clean”, limited research has focused on the impact of lean-green strategy on firm growth. In this study, we contribute to strategy and environmental sustainability literatures by investigating the possibility that the influence on lean-green strategy and firm growth is driven by different levels of industry competition, managerial power and family ties. Using panel data from 732 firms in four major industrialised economies (the US, Germany, France and the UK), we found that lean-green strategy positively relates to firm growth and this relationship is amplified at higher levels of competition, managerial power and family ties. Theoretical and practical implications of the study are also discussed.
    • Market sentiment and firm investment decision-making

      Danso, A.; Lartey, T.; Amankwah-Amoah, J.; Adomako, Samuel; Lu, Q.; Uddin, M. (Elsevier, 2019-11)
      While research on factors driving corporate investment decisions has blossomed, knowledge related to the Chief Executive Officer’s (CEO’s) market sentiment on investment decision outcomes is lacking. In this study, we extend the existing corporate finance literature by examining the underexplored issue of how CEOs’ market sentiment drives firms’ investment decisions. Capitalising on a large sample of US firms for the period 2004-2014, we uncovered some crucial observations. First, we found empirical support for our theoretical contention that market sentiment drives corporate investment decisions. Second, we established that, while financial flexibility induces managers to overinvest, the expectation of future profitability leads firms to underinvest during high sentiment periods. In addition, we uncovered that the 2007/08 financial crisis significantly impacted firm behaviour and realigned managerial decision-making. Thus, the sentiment-investment relationship is more pronounced during the crisis and the post-crisis periods. Our results are robust after accounting for the possibility of endogeneity and using alternative measures of both CEOs’ market sentiment and firm investment.
    • Stakeholder integration, environmental sustainability orientation, and financial performance

      Danso, A.; Adomako, Samuel; Lartey, T.; Amankwah-Amoah, J.; Owusu-Yirenkyi, D. (2020-10)
      Despite the growing research on the influence of stakeholder integration on organizational outcomes, our understanding of the specific firm-level conditions that may mediate the relationship between stakeholder integration and financial performance is lacking. Using primary data gathered from 233 small and medium-sized enterprises in Ghana, we found empirical support for our contention that the link between stakeholder integration and financial performance is mediated by a firm’s environmental sustainability orientation. In addition, our study demonstrated that competitive intensity moderates the indirect relationship between stakeholder integration and financial performance in such a way that the indirect effect through environmental sustainability orientation is stronger for higher levels of industry competition. We discuss theoretical and managerial implications of these findings.