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  • The IT way of loafing in class: Extending the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to understand students’ cyberslacking intentions

    Rana, Nripendra P.; Slade, E.; Kitching, S.; Dwivedi, Y.K. (2019-12)
    Internet-enabled technologies can facilitate students' learning, engagement, and productivity but they also present challenges by way of distraction. Cyberslacking is the use of internet-enabled technologies by students in class for non-class related activities. This research attempts to understand the factors that influence students' cyberslacking intentions in class, through extending the Theory of Planned Behavior with lack of attention, apathy towards course material, distraction by others, perceived threat, and escapism. Quantitative data were collected (n = 188) using a survey method with undergraduate and postgraduate students from a management school in a British university. All eight proposed hypotheses were found to be supported. The findings indicated that constructs such as lack of attention, apathy towards course material, and distraction by others are significant predictors of attitude. Further, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, perceived threat, and escapism were found to significantly influence students’ cyberslacking intentions.
  • From harmony to conflict: MacIntyrean virtue ethics in a Confucian tradition

    Chu, Irene; Moore, G. (2019)
    This paper explores whether MacIntyrean virtue ethics concepts are applicable in non-Western business contexts, specifically in SMEs in Taiwan a country strongly influenced by the Confucian tradition. It also explores what differences exist between different polities in this respect, and specifically interprets observed differences between the Taiwanese study and previous studies conducted in Europe and Asia. Based on case study research, the findings support the generalizability of the MacIntyrean framework. Drawing on the institutional logics perspective and synthesizing this with MacIntyrean concepts, the paper explains the differences between the studies largely by reference to the Confucian tradition operating at both the micro-level within firms and at the macro-level as a means of harmonizing the potentially competing institutional logics to which firms are subject. The recent weakening of this tradition, however, suggests that increased conflict may characterize the future.
  • Personnel Selection in the Digital Age: A Review of Validity and Applicant Reactions, and Future Research Challenges

    Woods, S.A.; Ahmed, S.; Nikolaou, I.; Costa, Ana-Cristina; Anderson, Neil (Taylor francis Group, 2019)
    We present a targeted review of recent developments and advances in digital selection procedures (DSPs) with particular attention to advances in internet-based techniques. By reviewing the emergence of DSPs in selection research and practice, we highlight five main categories of methods (online applications, online psychometric testing, digital interviews, gamified assessment and social media). We discuss the evidence base for each of these DSP groups, focusing on construct and criterion validity, and applicant reactions to their use in organizations. Based on the findings of our review, we present a critique of the evidence base for DSPs in industrial, work and organizational psychology and set out an agenda for advancing research. We identify pressing gaps in our understanding of DSPs, and ten key questions to be answered. Given that DSPs are likely to depart further from traditional nondigital selection procedures in the future, a theme in this agenda is the need to establish a distinct and specific literature on DSPs, and to do so at a pace that reflects the speed of the underlying technological advancement. In concluding, we, therefore, issue a call to action for selection researchers in work and organizational psychology to commence a new and rigorous multidisciplinary programme of scientific study of DSPs.
  • Mobile app stores from the user's perspectives

    Baabdullah, A.M.; Alalwan, A.A.; Rana, Nripendra P.; Shraah, A.A.; Kizgin, Hatice; Patil, P.P. (2019-05)
    The use of smartphones has become more prevalent in light of the boom in Internet services and Web 2.0 applications. Mobile stores (e.g., Apple’s App Store and Google Play) have been increasingly used by mobile users worldwide to download or purchase different kinds of applications. This has prompted mobile app practitioners to reconsider their mobile app stores in terms of design, features and functions in order to maintain their customers’ loyalty. Due to the lack of research on this context, this study aims to identify factors that may affect users’ satisfaction and continued intention toward using mobile stores. The proposed model includes various factors derived from information systems literature (i.e., usefulness, ease of use, perceived cost, privacy and security concerns) in addition to the dimensions of mobile interactivity (i.e. active control, mobility, and responsiveness). The study sets out 13 hypotheses that include mediating relationships (e.g., perceived usefulness mediates the influence of ease of use, active control, responsiveness and mobility; perceived ease of use mediates the influence of active control). As well as outlining the proposed research method, the research contributions, limitations and future research recommendations are also addressed.
  • Prevention of cybercrimes in smart cities of India: from a citizen's perspective

    Chatterjee, S.; Kar, A.K.; Dwivedi, Y.K.; Kizgin, Hatice (2019-10)
    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors influencing the citizens of India to prevent cybercrimes in the proposed Smart Cities of India. Design/methodology/approach: A conceptual model has been developed for identifying factors preventing cybercrimes. The conceptual model was validated empirically with a sample size of 315 participants from India. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling with SPSS and AMOS softwares. Findings: The study reveals that the “awareness of cybercrimes” significantly influences the actual usage of technology to prevent cybercrimes in Smart Cities of India. The study reveals that government initiative (GI) and legal awareness are less influential in spreading of the awareness of cybercrimes (AOC) to the citizens of the proposed smart cities. Research limitations/implications: The conceptual model utilizes two constructs from the technology adoption model, namely, perceived usefulness and ease of use. The study employs other factors such as social media, word of mouth, GIs, legal awareness and organizations constituting entities spreading awareness from different related literature works. Thereby, a comprehensive theoretical conceptual model has been proposed which helps to identify the factors that may help in preventing cybercrimes. Practical implications: This study provides an insight to the policy maker to understand several factors influencing the AOC of the citizens of the proposed Smart Cities of India for the prevention of cybercrimes. Originality/value: There are few existing studies analyzing the effect of AOC to mitigate cybercrimes. Thus, this study offers a novel contribution.
  • Balancing the scales of justice: Do perceptions of buyers' justice drive suppliers social performance?

    Alghababsheh, M.; Gallear, D.; Rahman, Mushfiqur M. (2018-09)
    A major challenge for supply chain managers is how to manage sourcing relationships to ensure reliable and predictable actions of distant suppliers. The extant research into sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) has traditionally focused on the transactional and collaboration approaches through which buyers encourage suppliers to act responsibly. However, little effort has been devoted to investigating the factors that underpin and enable effective implementation of these two approaches, or to exploring alternative approaches to help sustain an acceptable level of social performance from suppliers. Building on organisational justice theory, we developed a framework in which we propose that buyers’ justice (i.e. distributive, procedural and interactional) as perceived by suppliers can serve as an alternative and complementary vehicle to the conventional sustainability governance approaches for driving the social justice exhibited by suppliers. The paper sheds new light on an alternative relational approach to help to restrain potentially harmful acts of suppliers. It provides a foundation for new research avenues in the SSCM context and supports more informed decision making by practitioners.
  • Legitimisation strategies and managerial capture: a critical discourse analysis of employment relations in Nigeria

    Oruh, E.S.; Nwagbara, U.; Mordi, C.; Rahman, Mushfiqur M. (2019)
    Irrespective of the fundamental role of legitimacy in industrial relations as well as social and organisational life, little is known of the subtle meaning-making strategies through which organisational concepts, such as employment relations and engagement, are legitimised in modern world of work, particularly in developing countries such as Nigeria, which results in managerial capture. As a result, this paper explores the discursive legitimisation strategies used when making sense of employment relations in Nigeria’s conflictual, non-participatory employment relations terrain. Relying on Leeuwen’s (1995) legitimisation strategies, critical discourse analysis (CDA) and call by Bailey, Luck & Townsend (2009) and Legge (1995) to widen employment relations discourse, we explore interview, focus group and shadow report data, and distinguish and analyse five legitimisation strategies. The strategies include authorisation, moralisation, mythopoesis, rationalisation, and management. Therefore, we contend that while these specific legitimisation strategies appear in separate data source, their recurrent manifestation and application underscores legitimising discourse of managerial capture in Nigeria’s employment relations.
  • The impact of social media on consumers' acculturation and purchase intentions

    Kizgin, Hatice; Jamal, A.; Dey, B.L.; Rana, Nripendra P. (2018-06)
    Social media has emerged as a significant and effective means of assisting and endorsing activities and communications among peers, consumers and organizations that outdo the restrictions of time and space. While the previous studies acknowledge the role of agents of culture change, it largely remains silent on the role of social media in influencing acculturation outcomes and consumption choices. This study uses self-administered questionnaire to collect data from 514 Turkish-Dutch respondents and examines how their use of social media affects their acculturation and consumption choices. This research makes a significant contribution to consumer acculturation research by showing that social media is a vital means of culture change and a driver of acculturation strategies and consumption choices. This study is the first to investigate the role of social media as an agent of culture change in terms of how it impacts acculturation and consumption. The paper discusses implications for theory development and for practice.
  • Towards a framework for understanding ethnic consumers' acculturation strategies in a multicultural environment: a food consumption perspective

    Dey, B.L.; Alwi, S.; Yamoah, F.; Agyepong, S.A.; Kizgin, Hatice; Sarma, M. (2019-09-09)
    Purpose – While it is essential to further research the growing diversity in western metropolitan cities, little is currently known about how the members of various ethnic communities acculturate to multicultural societies. The purpose of this paper is to explore immigrants’ cosmopolitanism and acculturation strategies through an analysis of the food consumption behaviour of ethnic consumers in multicultural London. Design/methodology/approach – The study was set within the socio-cultural context of London. A number of qualitative methods such as in-depth interviews, observation and photographs were used to assess consumers’ acculturation strategies in a multicultural environment and how that is influenced by consumer cosmopolitanism. Findings – Ethnic consumers’ food consumption behaviour reflects their acculturation strategies, which can be classified into four groups: rebellion, rarefaction, resonance and refrainment. This classification demonstrates ethnic consumers’ multi-directional acculturation strategies, which are also determined by their level of cosmopolitanism. Research limitations/implications – The taxonomy presented in this paper advances current acculturation scholarship by suggesting a multi-directional model for acculturation strategies as opposed to the existing uni-directional and bi-directional perspectives and explicates the role of consumer cosmopolitanism in consumer acculturation. The paper did not engage host communities and there is hence a need for future research on how and to what extent host communities are acculturated to the multicultural environment. Practical implications – The findings have direct implications for the choice of standardisation vs adaptation as a marketing strategy within multicultural cities. Whilst the rebellion group are more likely to respond to standardisation, increasing adaptation of goods and service can ideally target members of the resistance and resonance groups and more fusion products should be exclusively earmarked for the resonance group.
  • A cognitive analytics management framework for the transformation of electronic government services from users perspective to create sustainable shared values

    Osman, I.H.; Anouze, A.L.; Irani, Zahir; Lee, H.; Medeni, T.D.; Weerakkody, Vishanth J.P. (2019-10-16)
    Electronic government services (e-services) involve the delivery of information and services to stakeholders via the Internet, Internet of Things and other traditional modes. Despite their beneficial values, the overall level of usage (take-up) remains relatively low compared to traditional modes. They are also challenging to evaluate due to behavioral, economical, political, and technical aspects. The literature lacks a methodology framework to guide the government transformation application to improve both internal processes of e-services and institutional transformation to advance relationships with stakeholders. This paper proposes a cognitive analytics management (CAM) framework to implement such transformations. The ambition is to increase users’ take-up rate and satisfaction, and create sustainable shared values through provision of improved e-services. The CAM framework uses cognition to understand and frame the transformation challenge into analytics terms. Analytics insights for improvements are generated using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). A classification and regression tree is then applied to DEA results to identify characteristics of satisfaction to advance relationships. The importance of senior management is highlighted for setting strategic goals and providing various executive supports. The CAM application for the transforming Turkish e-services is validated on a large sample data using online survey. The results are discussed; the outcomes and impacts are reported in terms of estimated savings of more than fifteen billion dollars over a ten-year period and increased usage of improved new e-services. We conclude with future research.
  • A framework for analysing blockchain technology adoption: Integrating institutional, market and technical factors

    Janssen, M.; Weerakkody, Vishanth J.P.; Ismagilova, Elvira; Sivarajah, Uthayasankar; Irani, Zahir (2020-02)
    The adoption of blockchain technologies require the consideration of a broad range of factors, over and above the predominantly technology focus of most current work. Whilst scholarly literature on blockchain technology is only beginning to emerge, majority are focused on the technicalities of the technology and tend to ignore the organizational complexities of adopting the technology. Drawing from a focused review of literature, this paper proposed a conceptual framework for adoption of blockchain technology capturing the complex relationships between institutional, market and technical factors. The framework highlights that varying outcomes are possible, and the change process is focal as this shapes the form blockchain applications take. Factors presented in the framework (institutional, market and technical) interact and mutually influence each other. The proposed framework can be used by organisations as a reference point for adopting blockchain applications and by scholars to expand, refine and evaluate research into blockchain technology.
  • Small business growth and performance

    Adomako, Samuel; Mole, K.F. (Sage, 2018)
    Research on business growth has blossomed, yet scholars often complain face the difficulty of distililing a clearer pitcure of the business growth phenomenon. This paper attempts to overcome this limitation by reviewing and synthesizing extant research on business growth. First, we begin by examining Penrose’s view of firm growth. Second, we highlight how business growth is measured; these are absolute or relative change and growth as a process. Third, we explore theories of business growth; integrated models-theories that explain the factors that drive business growth and (2) stage models which view business growth as a series of phases or stages of development through which a firm must pass in its life-cycle. Fourth, we examine modes of business growth; these are organic vs. acquisition growth, growth through networks and alliances and growth through internationalization. Fifth, we examine drivers and constraints to business growth. We conclude the review by pointing out areas of harmony and contention in the literature, from which we suggest opportunities for future research.
  • The Inherent Tensions within Sustainable Supply Chains: A Case Study from Bangladesh

    Shareef, M.A.; Dwivedi, Y.K.; Kumar, V.; Mahmud, R.; Hughes, D.L.; Kizgin, Hatice (Francis and Taylor, 2019)
    The complexities surrounding the supply chain logistics for perishable commodities within Bangladesh are extensive. Poor infrastructure, fragmented transportation and corruption compound the operational complexities within this emerging market. This case study analyses many of the day-to-day operational challenges and tensions inherent within Micro-Small-Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) forming the backbone of the Bangladesh socio-economic structure. The drive for transition toward greater levels of sustainability and corporate responsibility is problematic, affecting many levels within an extended and fragmented supply chain. The selected case study highlights the “lived in” geographical, environmental, economic and cultural factors that impact the ability of emerging market enterprises to remain profitable within emergency scenarios whilst transitioning toward a more sustainable model. This study, whilst detailing many of the tensions and critical issues facing MSMEs, highlights the benefits of direct Government intervention, criticality of a leaner and more efficient supply chain and reassessment of financial incentives to drive the transition to a more efficient and sustainable economy.
  • R&D intensity, knowledge creation process and new product performance: The mediating role of international R&D teams

    Adomako, Samuel; Amankwah-Amoah, J.; Danso, A.; Danquah, Joseph K.; Hussain, Zahid I.; Khan, Z. (Elsevier, 2019)
    Although previous studies have shown the positive effect of research and development (R&D) intensity on new product performance (NPP), our understanding about the mechanisms through which R&D intensity influence NPP is less understood. In this paper, we focus on the mediating role of international R&D teams in explaining the effect of R&D intensity on NPP. Since R&D teams are dispersed across the globe, thus examining the role of international R&D teams will provide a more nuanced understanding of the mechanisms through which R&D intensity contributes to NPP. Using survey data from 201 Ghanaian firms engaged in internationalization activities, the results suggest that the use of international R&D teams mediates the relationship between R&D intensity and NPP. Moreover, the findings indicate that the use of international R&D teams improves NPP and that this linkage is amplified when the knowledge creation process inside the firm is stronger. We discuss the implications of these findings for theory and practice.
  • Advertising, earnings prediction and market value: An analysis of persistent UK advertisers

    Shah, S.Z.A.; Akbar, Saeed; Ahmad, S.; Stark, A.W. (Wiley, 2019)
    This paper examines whether major media advertising expenditures help in predicting future earnings. We consider the role of media advertising in firms’ marketing efforts and posit that persistent advertisers are more likely to benefit from advertising activities in creating long‐lived intangible assets. Employing a sample of persistent UK advertisers over the period 1997–2013, we find that advertising expenditures are significantly positively associated with firms’ future earnings and market value. We also report size and sector‐based differences in the association between advertising and firms’ future earnings. Our additional analysis provides support for the arguments that despite the recent rise in digital advertising budgets, traditional advertising media are still effective in positively influencing firms’ performance. Overall, the results of this study are consistent with the view that advertising expenditures produce intangible assets, at least for firms in certain sectors. These findings have implications for marketers in providing evidence of the value generated by firms’ advertising budgets, for investors in validating the relevance of advertising information in influencing future earnings, and for accounting regulators in relation to the provision of useful insights for any future deliberations on financial reporting policies for advertising expenditures.
  • Blockchain and cryptocurrencies: essential tools in a two-tier financial system

    Kapsis, Ilias (2019)
    • This article discusses the current situation in the market of cryptocurrencies and joins the debate about the regulation of these financial innovations. • It argues that the appearance of cryptocurrencies was a response to market demand for more affordable and more inclusive banking. • It also argues that distributed ledger technology (DLT) which supports cryptocurrencies and has different characteristics than the technology used by traditional banking could help to create with cryptocurrencies a new, lower cost, more inclusive financial ecosystem separate from the traditional one. • The two ecosystems (traditional and new one) would form a larger two-tier financial ecosystem, which, overall would be more inclusive and more affordable. Also, it would be more effective in containing contagion and major economic disruption during future financial crises. • The current reliance on a single, ever growing, and immensely complex financial ecosystem is not sustainable longer term as systemic risks grow with the system and there are no mechanisms available to fully eliminate these risks. The costs of regulating the current market architecture are also excessively high.
  • Toward a conceptual model for examining the role of social media on social customer relationship management (SCRM) system

    Baabdullah, A.M.; Rana, Nripendra P.; Alalwan, A.A.; Algharabat, R.; Kizgin, Hatice; Al-Weshah, G.A. (2019-01)
    Organizations worldwide are becoming more interested in utilizing social media applications to enhance their marketing capabilities. One of the main fruits of integrating social media applications into the marketing, information technology and information systems areas is social customer relationship management (SCRM). SCRM has been the focus of attention for both marketing academics and practitioners. However, as this area is quite new, there is a need to propose a theoretical foundation explaining how using social media platforms for SCRM systems could predict customer engagement and customer relationship performance. Three main factors, i.e. social media use, a customer-centric management system, and relationship marketing orientation, are considered as key predictors of SCRM. SCRM is proposed as a key determinant of customer engagement, which in turn affects customer relationship performance. The proposed research methodology suggests conducting a quantitative study to validate the current study model. Further discussion regarding the research contribution and main limitations are provided in the last sections.
  • Identifying reputation collectors in community question answering (CQA) sites: Exploring the dark side of social media

    Roy, P.K.; Singh, J.P.; Baabdullah, A.M.; Kizgin, Hatice; Rana, Nripendra P. (2018-10)
    This research aims to identify users who are posting as well as encouraging others to post low-quality and duplicate contents on community question answering sites. The good guys called Caretakers and the bad guys called Reputation Collectors are characterised by their behaviour, answering pattern and reputation points. The proposed system is developed and analysed over publicly available Stack Exchange data dump. A graph based methodology is employed to derive the characteristic of Reputation Collectors and Caretakers. Results reveal that Reputation Collectors are primary sources of low-quality answers as well as answers to duplicate questions posted on the site. The Caretakers answer limited questions of challenging nature and fetches maximum reputation against those questions whereas Reputation Collectors answers have so many low-quality and duplicate questions to gain the reputation point. We have developed algorithms to identify the Caretakers and Reputation Collectors of the site. Our analysis finds that 1.05% of Reputation Collectors post 18.88% of low quality answers. This study extends previous research by identifying the Reputation Collectors and 2 how they collect their reputation points.
  • Disaster management in Bangladesh: developing an effective emergency supply chain network

    Shareef, M.A.; Dwivedi, Y.K.; Mahmud, R.; Wright, A.; Rahman, Mushfiqur M.; Kizgin, Hatice; Rana, Nripendra P. (2018-10)
    This study has addressed and identified the problems in managing the existing emergency supply chain of Bangladesh in all phases of operation in terms of the primary drivers of the supply chain. It has also attempted to conceptualize and suggest an effective emergency supply chain. In this context, a thorough field investigation in several districts was conducted among the employees of the organizations sharing common information with similar protocols and implications (interoperable). Information was collected from the employees of all the participating organizations involved in disaster management through a semi-structured questionnaire based survey. The respondents addressed and illustrated several interconnected reasons which are inhibiting proper forecasting, procurement, storage, identification of affected people, and distribution. The respondents pointed out that the mismatching of objectives in the different organizations resulted in non-interoperability among the participating organizations. These issues are related to the malfunctioning of management with multidimensional organizational conflicts. Reflecting those issues, an emergency supply chain for disaster management is proposed in this study
  • Consumption of products from heritage and host cultures: The role of acculturation attitudes and behaviors

    Kizgin, Hatice; Jamal, A.; Richard, M-O. (2018-01)
    Prior research ignores the specific role of acculturation attitudes in predicting acculturation behaviors and consumption choices across public and private life domains. The study uses self-administered questionnaires to collect data from 530 Turkish-Dutch respondents. The findings underscore the overall significance of investigating domain-specific (public vs. private) acculturation attitudes and subsequent acculturation behaviors. Enculturation (acculturation) behaviors function as a mediating variable in the relationship between acculturation attitudes and consumption of food and entertainment products from the heritage (host) culture. The study is one of the first to investigate the simultaneous effects of acculturation attitudes and acculturation behaviors on the choice to consumer foods and entertainment products from both heritage and host cultures. The article provides managerial implications and future research directions.

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