• Oil and armed conflict in Casanare/Colombia: complex contexts and contingent moments .

      Pearce, Jenny V. (Pluto Press, 2007)
      Are oil-rich countries prone to war? And, if so, why? There is a widely held belief that contemporary wars are motivated by the desire of great powers like the United States or Russia to control precious oil resources and to ensure energy security. This book argues that the main reason why oil-rich countries are prone to war is because of the character of their society and economy. Sectarian groups compete for access to oil resources and finance their military adventures through smuggling oil, kidnapping oil executives, or blowing up pipelines. Outside intervention only makes things worse. The use of conventional military force as in Iraq can bring neither stability nor security of supply. This book examines the relationship between oil and war in six different regions: Angola, Azerbaijan, Colombia, Indonesia, Nigeria and Russia. Each country has substantial oil reserves, and has a long history of conflict. The contributors assess what part oil plays in causing, aggravating or mitigating war in each region and how this relation has altered with the changing nature of war. It offers a novel conceptual approach bringing together Kaldor's work on 'new wars' and Karl's work on the petro-state.
    • A War too Far: Iraq, Iran and the New American Century

      Rogers, Paul F. (2006)
      There are few today who can claim that the US occupation of Iraq has been a success, for Iraq or the US. A War Too Far takes this on by looking back on the many unanswered questions about the invasion itself. What was the real reason for the Iraq War? Did George Bush ever have a strategy to confront al-Qaida in one arena? How does the invasion alter Iraq's relationship with Iran? And what does this mean for the future? World-renowned security expert Paul Rogers tackles these questions, offering a uniquely insightful analysis of events during and after the war. Examining the delicate balance of power in Iraq, he explores the options for a US exit strategy, and how the invasion affects America's relationship with Iran. Paul Rogers predicted in 2000 that the US would experience a terrorist attack on its own soil. Subsequent events proved how accurate he was. This book is required reading for students, journalists, policy-makers and anyone interested in getting the whole story about the dangerous consequences of the latest American venture in the Middle East. Paul Rogers explores: ¿ The neo-conservative vision of a US-dominated Middle East ¿ The oil link ¿ Iraq's significance in energy geopolitics ¿ Links with Israel ¿ the development of close military cooperation between the US and Israeli military ¿ The growing possibility of a war on Iran and its potential repercussions.