• Leading in Health Care: challenging boundaries and future potential

      Hardy, Maryann L.; Snaith, Beverly; Henwood, S. (2014)
    • Lean management in the NHS: fad or panacea

      McIntosh, Bryan; Cookson, G. (2012)
      Lean principles emerged in the Japanese manufacturing industry after the Second World War. Lean management focuses on improving product quality while eliminating waste—primarily through process redesign and the integration of employees, management, suppliers and customers into the quality management process. The NHS is under significant pressure to improve productivity while maintaining or improving service quality, at the same time as service demand increases. The Quality, Innovation, Productivity and Prevention (QIPP) programme’s primary concern is to ensure that financial resources are used to bring maximum benefit and quality of care to patients (Department of Health, 2010). Lean management could therefore offer a panacea for the NHS, although its applicability to the health service sector is contested. This article investigates whether lean management is merely a fad or whether it could alleviate the pressure the NHS faces. While specific clinical processes may easily adopt lean processes and practices, healthcare organisations will need a paradigm shift in their management philosophy to adopt lean more widely. The promise of lean management remains elusive but could be harnessed by willing organisations.
    • The learning curve to achieve satisfactory completion rates in upper GI endoscopy: an analysis of a national training database

      Ward, S.T.; Hancox, A.; Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Ismail, T.; Griffiths, E.A.; Valori, R.; Dunckley, P. (2017-06)
      Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the number of OGDs (oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopies) trainees need to perform to acquire competency in terms of successful unassisted completion to the second part of the duodenum 95% of the time. Design: OGD data were retrieved from the trainee e-portfolio developed by the Joint Advisory Group on GI Endoscopy ( JAG) in the UK. All trainees were included unless they were known to have a baseline experience of >20 procedures or had submitted data for <20 procedures. The primary outcome measure was OGD completion, defined as passage of the endoscope to the second part of the duodenum without physical assistance. The number of OGDs required to achieve a 95% completion rate was calculated by the moving average method and learning curve cumulative summation (LC-Cusum) analysis. To determine which factors were independently associated with OGD completion, a mixed effects logistic regression model was constructed with OGD completion as the outcome variable. Results: Data were analysed for 1255 trainees over 288 centres, representing 243 555 OGDs. By moving average method, trainees attained a 95% completion rate at 187 procedures. By LC-Cusum analysis, after 200 procedures, >90% trainees had attained a 95% completion rate. Total number of OGDs performed, trainee age and experience in lower GI endoscopy were factors independently associated with OGD completion. Conclusions: There are limited published data on the OGD learning curve. This is the largest study to date analysing the learning curve for competency acquisition. The JAG competency requirement for 200 procedures appears appropriate
    • Learning from mistakes: What leagues won’t do

      McIntosh, Bryan; Pascoe, P. (2016-04)
      In March, the Department of Health (DH) released the Learning from Mistakes League, in which NHS organisations are ranked by levels of openness and transparency (DH, 2016). While a welcome first step toward the centralised and open promotion of learning since the publication of the Francis and Berwick reports three years earlier, unfortunately, the league can be considered misleading for a number of reasons.
    • Letter re: Comparison of acetabular and femoral morphologies on hip, pelvic, and lumbar radiographs (Yun et al.)

      Snaith, Beverly; Flintham, K. (2018)
      We read with interest the recent article by Yun et al. [1] comparing acetabular and hip measurements across pelvis, hip and lumbar spine radiographs. The authors assert that lumbar radiographs can be utilised in place of routine pelvis radiographs for these measurements. The example lumbar spine radiograph (figure 2) appears to be an abdominal image, with a contrast urogram. Indeed, standard texts [2,3] confirm that the anteroposterior lumbar spine radiograph should not include any coverage of the hips as appropriate collimation should limit the anatomy to T12 superiorly, lower sacrum inferiorly and the sacroiliac joints laterally, which would exclude the hip joints. Thus assessing any hip measurements on an appropriately collimated lumbar spine radiograph should not be possible. This is further compounded by the description of the centring point within their study (iliac crest), which varies from the internationally recognised standard of lower costal margin/L3 [2,3].
    • Limited receipt of support services among people with mild-to-moderate dementia: findings from the IDEAL cohort

      O. van Horik, J.; Collins, R.; Martyr, A.; Henderson, C.; Jones, R.W.; Knapp, M.; Quinn, Catherine; Thom, J.M.; Victor, C.; Clare, L. (2022-03)
      Background: Global initiatives that promote public health responses to dementia have resulted in numerous countries developing new national policies. Current policy guidelines in England, for example, recommend that people diagnosed with mild-to-moderate dementia receive information and psychosocial interventions to improve their ability to ‘live well’. However, it remains unclear to what extent these recommendations are being achieved. Methods: Self-reported information from 1537 people living with dementia and informant-reported information from 1277 carers of people living with dementia was used to quantify receipt of community-based dementia support services, including health and social care services provided by statutory or voluntary-sector organisations, in Britain from 2014 to 2016. Demographic factors associated with differences in receipt of support services were also investigated to identify particularly vulnerable groups of people living with dementia. Results: Both self- and informant reports suggested that approximately 50% of people living with dementia received support services for dementia. Receipt of support services was lower among people living with dementia who are older, female, and have fewer educational qualifications. Receipt of support services also differed according to diagnosis and carer status, but was unrelated to marital status. Conclusions: Limited receipt of dementia support services among people living with dementia in Britain provides a baseline to assess the efficacy of current policy guidelines regarding provision of information and support. Targeted efforts to facilitate receipt of support services among the particularly vulnerable groups identified in the current study could improve the efficacy of dementia support services both in Britain and internationally, and should inform policy development.
    • A Limited Role for Suppression in the Central Field of Individuals with Strabismic Amblyopia.

      Barrett, Brendan T.; Panesar, Gurvinder K.; Scally, Andy J.; Pacey, Ian E. (2012)
      Background: Although their eyes are pointing in different directions, people with long-standing strabismic amblyopia typically do not experience double-vision or indeed any visual symptoms arising from their condition. It is generally believed that the phenomenon of suppression plays a major role in dealing with the consequences of amblyopia and strabismus, by preventing images from the weaker/deviating eye from reaching conscious awareness. Suppression is thus a highly sophisticated coping mechanism. Although suppression has been studied for over 100 years the literature is equivocal in relation to the extent of the retina that is suppressed, though the method used to investigate suppression is crucial to the outcome. There is growing evidence that some measurement methods lead to artefactual claims that suppression exists when it does not. Methodology/Results: Here we present the results of an experiment conducted with a new method to examine the prevalence, depth and extent of suppression in ten individuals with strabismic amblyopia. Seven subjects (70%) showed no evidence whatsoever for suppression and in the three individuals who did (30%), the depth and extent of suppression was small. Conclusions: Suppression may play a much smaller role in dealing with the negative consequences of strabismic amblyopia than previously thought. Whereas recent claims of this nature have been made only in those with micro-strabismus our results show extremely limited evidence for suppression across the central visual field in strabismic amblyopes more generally. Instead of suppressing the image from the weaker/deviating eye, we suggest the visual system of individuals with strabismic amblyopia may act to maximise the possibilities for binocular co-operation. This is consistent with recent evidence from strabismic and amblyopic individuals that their binocular mechanisms are intact, and that, just as in visual normals, performance with two eyes is better than with the better eye alone in these individuals.
    • Literature Evaluation and Critique

      Scally, Andy J.; Brealey, S. (2010)
    • Living alone with mild-to-moderate dementia: findings from the IDEAL Cohort

      Clare, L.; Martyr, A.; Henderson, C.; Gamble, L.; Matthews, F.E.; Quinn, Catherine; Nelis, S.M.; Rusted, J.; Thom, J.; Knapp, M.; et al. (2020-11)
      A significant proportion of people with dementia live alone, but little is known about their specific needs. To understand the profile of people living alone with mild-to-moderate dementia in the UK and identify any systematic differences associated with living situation. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,541 people with mild-to-moderate dementia and 1,277 caregivers participating in the IDEAL cohort at the first wave of assessment. There were 1,256 (81.5%) people with dementia living with others and 285 (18.5%) living alone, of whom 51 (3% of whole sample) reported little or no informal support. There were relatively few differences associated with living situation and odds ratios were generally small. People living alone were older on average, and more likely to be female, than those living with others. Those living alone were more likely to have higher cognitive ability and self-reported functional ability, and more social contact with those from other households. They were also lonelier, expressed less satisfaction with life, and used home care services and equipment more. There were no differences in symptoms, mood, quality of life, or well-being. The findings support the view that it is possible to 'live well' with mild-to-moderate dementia while living alone, given appropriate support, including home care and equipment. Nevertheless, it is important to consider how those living alone may be supported to have a more satisfactory experience, and how health and social care services can best respond to their needs.
    • Living well with dementia: a systematic review and correlational meta-analysis of factors associated with quality of life, well-being and life satisfaction in people with dementia

      Martyr, A.; Nelis, S.M.; Quinn, Catherine; Wu, Y.-T.; Lamont, R.A.; Henderson, C.; Clarke, R.; Hindle, J.V.; Thom, J.M.; Jones, I.R.; et al. (2018-10)
      Current policy emphasises the importance of 'living well' with dementia, but there has been no comprehensive synthesis of the factors related to quality of life (QoL), subjective well-being or life satisfaction in people with dementia. We examined the available evidence in a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched electronic databases until 7 January 2016 for observational studies investigating factors associated with QoL, well-being and life satisfaction in people with dementia. Articles had to provide quantitative data and include ⩾75% people with dementia of any type or severity. We included 198 QoL studies taken from 272 articles in the meta-analysis. The analysis focused on 43 factors with sufficient data, relating to 37639 people with dementia. Generally, these factors were significantly associated with QoL, but effect sizes were often small (0.1-0.29) or negligible (<0.09). Factors reflecting relationships, social engagement and functional ability were associated with better QoL. Factors indicative of poorer physical and mental health (including depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms) and poorer carer well-being were associated with poorer QoL. Longitudinal evidence about predictors of QoL was limited. There was a considerable between-study heterogeneity. The pattern of numerous predominantly small associations with QoL suggests a need to reconsider approaches to understanding and assessing living well with dementia.
    • Living well with dementia: what is possible and how to promote it

      Quinn, Catherine; Pickett, James A.; Litherland, R.; Morris, R.G.; Martyr, A.; Clare, L. (2022-01)
      Key points: The focus on living well with dementia encourages a more positive and empowering approach. The right support can improve the experience of living with dementia. An holistic approach to assessing the needs of people with dementia and identifying the factors that impact on their well-being is essential. Enabling people to live better requires a broad approach that encompasses both health and social systems and the wider community.
    • Living with a diagnosis of behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia: The person’s experience.

      Griffin, J.; Oyebode, Jan R.; Allen, J. (2015)
      Research investigating behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia has concentrated on identifying and quantifying people’s difficulties; yet few studies have considered how people with behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia make sense of their difficulties. Five participants were interviewed and interpretive phenomenological analysis used to analyse the data. Two superordinate themes emerged: ‘Bewilderment’ and ‘Relationships with others’. ‘Bewilderment’ reflected the feelings of the participants from the start of their dementia, and was divided into two main themes (1) ‘Awareness of change: What’s the problem? and (2) Threats to self: This is not me. The superordinate theme, ‘Relationships with others’, reflected difficulties with social relationships and comprised two main themes (1) ‘Family and friends: Things haven’t changed… but do I say anything wrong?’ and (2) Coping with threats to self: Blame others or just avoid them. The themes were discussed in relation to literature evaluating the difficulties associated with behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia together with implications for clinical practice.
    • Living with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: patients concerns regarding death and dying

      Gardiner, C.; Gott, M.; Small, Neil A.; Payne, S.; Seamark, D.; Barnes, S.; Halpin, D.; Ruse, C. (2009)
      Prognosis in COPD is poor and many patients perceive shortcomings in the education they receive about aspects of their condition. This study explores the experiences of patients with COPD, particularly fears surrounding death and dying. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 patients with moderate or severe COPD. Findings revealed that patient understanding of COPD was poor, most patients were unaware of the progressive nature of the condition, and few were aware they could die of COPD. Despite this, patients often expressed concerns that their condition might deteriorate. Patients had particular concerns regarding the manner of their death; the overriding fear was dying of breathlessness or suffocation. None of the patients' had discussed these fears with a health care professional. Improved patient education is needed in order to improve patients understanding of their condition and prognosis. Open communication regarding death, as advocated in a palliative care approach, is also appropriate to alleviate patients fears and to allow them to make decisions regarding the management of their care at the end of life.
    • Living with dementia during the COVID-19 pandemic: coping and support needs of community-dwelling people with dementia and their family carers. Research findings from the IDEAL COVID-19 Dementia Initiative (IDEAL-CDI)

      O'Rourke, G.; Pentecost, C.; van den Heuvel, E.; Victor, C.; Quinn, Catherine; Hillman, A.; Litherland, R.; Clare, L. (Older People and Frailty Policy Research Group, 2021-02)
      We interviewed people with dementia and carers from the IDEAL cohort to find out how the COVID-19 lockdown and continuing restrictions affected those living with dementia. Some people with dementia coped well, while others coped with difficulty or were only just coping. The additional stress of COVID-19 exacerbated pre-existing coping difficulties. For many, social isolation increased anxiety. Some felt that lack of activity or lack of social contact caused a decline in their abilities to manage everyday tasks. Confusion about COVID-19 rules or difficulty remembering what to do led to anxiety when leaving the house. People felt that members of the public might not understand their particular needs. While some carers felt they were coping well, others experienced stress when having to leave the home because the person with dementia might not be safe if left alone. Some experienced increased strain in the caring relationship compounded by an uncertainty about future availability of respite. Some were concerned about the complex health needs of the person with dementia alongside COVID-19 risk and lack of personalised information. Both people with dementia and carers talked about the importance of access to safe outdoor space. People were anxious about how others would react or behave towards them regarding keeping a distance if they went out. Being connected to friends, family and wider community or support groups was important to help combat the effects of isolation. People from BAME communities worried about their increased vulnerability to the virus. A lack of trust in Government guidance and in health care services added to their anxiety. However, some benefitted from strong community and faith group involvement. What might be helpful for people with dementia? • Reablement to help regain or maintain skills • Personalised health advice regarding managing COVID-19 risk and the opportunity to ask questions. • Identification of people with dementia who live alone and an assessment of their needs. What might be helpful for carers? • Needs assessment in regard to respite. • Novel forms of respite care that incorporate social distancing. What might be helpful for both carers and people with dementia? • Access to COVID-safe outdoor spaces. • Continuation and expansion of ‘just checking’ services. • Support to get online and use the internet. • Communication and information through non-digital means. • Community COVID-19 ‘dementia awareness’ initiatives. What might be helpful for people from Black and minority ethnic groups? • Addressing concerns about their increased risk of COVID-19. • Directing information and support through existing community and faith groups.