• Impact of dementia care education and training on health and social care staff knowledge, attitudes and confidence: a cross-sectional survey

      Parveen, Sahdia; Smith, S.J.; Sass, C.; Oyebode, Jan R.; Capstick, Andrea; Dennison, Alison; Surr, C.A. (2021-01-19)
      The aim of this study was to establish the impact of dementia education and training on the knowledge, attitudes and confidence of health and social care staff. The study also aimed to identify the most effective features (content and pedagogical) of dementia education and training. Cross-sectional survey study. Data collection occurred in 2017. Health and social care staff in the UK including acute care, mental health community care trusts, primary care and care homes. All health and social care staff who had completed dementia education and training meeting the minimal standards as set by Health Education England, within the past 5 years were invited to participate in an online survey. A total of 668 health and social care staff provided informed consent and completed an online survey, and responses from 553 participants were included in this study. The majority of the respondents were of white British ethnicity (94.4%) and identified as women (88.4%). Knowledge, attitude and confidence of health and social care staff. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted. Staff characteristics, education and training content variables and pedagogical factors were found to account for 29% of variance in staff confidence (F=4.13, p<0.001), 22% of variance in attitude (knowledge) (F=3.80, p<001), 18% of the variance in staff knowledge (F=2.77, p<0.01) and 14% of variance in staff comfort (attitude) (F=2.11, p<0.01). The results suggest that dementia education and training has limited impact on health and social care staff learning outcomes. While training content variables were important when attempting to improve staff knowledge, more consideration should be given to pedagogical factors when training is aiming to improve staff attitude and confidence.
    • Initial evaluation of a university dementia awareness initiative

      Parveen, Sahdia; Haunch, K.; Kerry, F.; Oyebode, Jan R. (2018-09)
      Purpose: This paper describes a study which explored the knowledge and attitudes of university students towards people living with dementia, and developed and tested a dementia awareness workshop, Dementia Detectives: University edition, designed to improve knowledge and foster positive attitudes to dementia in students. Design/methodology/approach: Dementia Detectives: University edition was launched during Dementia Awareness Week and five workshops were delivered to university students. Forty-two participants attended and completed a knowledge and attitude measure before and after the workshop, as well as rating the workshop with regards to satisfaction, relevance, understanding and whether they would recommend the workshop to friends. Findings: Students perceived living with dementia to be a negative and stigmatised experience. The workshop scored highly in terms of satisfaction, relevance and understanding and all students stated they would recommend the workshop to others. Paired t-tests found significant improvements in self-assessed dementia knowledge. Research Limitations: This was a pilot evaluation and further testing with larger samples is required. Practical implications: The workshop meets the requirements for tier 1 dementia education and training as outlined in the Dementia Core Skills and Knowledge Framework published by the Department of Health. Social implications: The workshop has the potential to increase knowledge, change attitudes, improve empathy and contribute to the development of a dementia aware workforce through undergraduate education. Originality/value: Dementia Detectives: University edition is a novel interactive method of dementia education and training.