• Perceptions of Dental Health Professionals (DHPs) on job satisfaction in Fiji: A qualitative study

      Kumar, S.; Mohammadnezhad, Masoud (2022-08-29)
      Reviewing factors that affect work challenges is crucial for any organization as it has an impact of organizational commitment for a better service delivery and job satisfaction. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of dental health professionals (DHPs) on work challenges and the impact it has on job satisfaction in Fiji. Materials and Methods: A descriptive, qualitative method approach (nationwide) was done commencing from August to November, 2021. DHPs who provide prosthetic services in Fiji were selected using purposive selection located at Nakasi Dental Clinic, Lautoka Dental Clinic, Labasa Dental Clinic, and Fiji National University. A total of 29 DHPs participated in the in-depth interview, and the responses were grouped into nine themes: working conditions, the location of practice, equipment and material, a lack of specialization, service delivery, organizational support, remuneration, career development, and promotions. A semi-structured open-ended questionnaire in the form of an interview via a virtual platform—Zoom was used for data collection. Thematic analysis was used to transcribe and analyze the audio recordings. Results: The findings from the study indicated that factors such as working conditions, the location of practice, equipment and material, a lack of specialization, service delivery, organizational support, remuneration, career development, and promotions were associated with work challenges. Conclusion: Gaps and areas for the improvement of work challenges and its impact on job satisfaction were identified for DHPs who provide prosthetic services in Fiji such as a need for more career and professional development pathways, improved infrastructure to support prosthetic service delivery, and better remuneration.
    • Supporting direct care workers in dementia care: effects of a psycho-educational intervention

      Barbosa, Ana; Nolan, M.; Sousa, I.; Figueiredo, D. (2015-03-01)
      An experimental study using a pre-posttest control group design was conducted to assess the effects of a person-centred care based psycho-educational intervention on direct care workers’ stress, burnout and job satisfaction. The intervention aimed to develop person-centred care competences and tools for stress management. Four aged care facilities were randomly assigned to a psycho-educational or an education-only intervention (control). Data were collected from fifty-six direct care workers (female, mean age 44.72±9.02) through measurements of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory), job satisfaction (Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire-short form) and stress (Perceived Stress Scale) and focus-group interviews. Results showed significant positive effects in emotional exhaustion (p=0.029) and positive but no significant effects in stress and job satisfaction. According to qualitative data, the experimental group perceived enhanced group cohesion, emotional management and self-care awareness. Psycho-educational interventions may contribute to reduce direct care workers’ burnout. Further work is needed to determine the extent of its benefits.