• Effectiveness of fluoroscopy-guided intra-articular steroid injection for hip osteoarthritis

      Subedi, N.; Chew, N.S.; Chandramohan, M.; Scally, Andy J.; Groves, C. (2015-11-11)
      AIM: To demonstrate the benefits of fluoroscopy-guided intra-articular steroid injection in the hip with varying degrees of disease severity, and to investigate the financial aspects of the procedure and impact on waiting time. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study was undertaken of patients who underwent fluoroscopic intra-articular steroid injection over the 9-month study period. Comparative analysis of the Oxford hip pain score pre- and 6-8 weeks post-intra-articular injection was performed. Hip radiographs of all patients were categorised as normal, mild, moderate, or severe disease (four categories) based on the modified Kellgren-Lawrence severity scale, and improvement on the Oxford hip pain score on each of these four severity categories were assessed. RESULTS: Within the study cohort of 100 patients, the mean increase in post-procedure hip score of 7.32 points confirms statistically significant benefits of the therapy (p<0.001, 95% confidence interval: 5.55-9.09). There was no significant difference in pre-injection hip score or change in score between the four severity categories (p=0.51). Significant improvement in hip score (p<0.05) was demonstrated in each of the four severity categories 6-8 weeks post-injection. No associated complications were observed. CONCLUSION: The present study confirms that fluoroscopy-guided intra-articular steroid injection is a highly effective therapeutic measure for hip osteoarthritis across all grades of disease severity with significant cost savings and the potential to reduce waiting times.
    • Use of single-vision distance spectacles improves landing control during step descent in well-adapted multifocal lens-wearers

      Timmis, Matthew A.; Johnson, Louise; Elliott, David B.; Buckley, John G. (2010)
      PURPOSE: Epidemiologic research has shown that multifocal spectacle wearers (bifocal and progressive addition lenses [PALs]) are more than twice as likely to fall than are nonmultifocal spectacle wearers, with this risk further increasing when negotiating stairs. The present study investigated whether step and stair descent safety is improved by using single-vision distance lenses. METHODS: From a stationary standing position on top of a block, 20 long-term multifocal wearers stepped down (from different block heights) onto a lower level wearing bifocal, progressive addition, or single-vision distance lenses. RESULTS: Use of single-vision distance spectacles led to an increased single-limb support time, a reduced ankle and knee angle and vertical center-of-mass velocity at contact with the lower level, and a reduced ankle angular velocity and vertical center-of-mass velocity during initial landing (P < 0.03). These findings indicate that landing occurred in a more controlled manner when the subjects wore single-vision distance spectacles, rather than tending to "drop" onto the lower level as occurred when wearing bifocals or PALs. CONCLUSIONS: Use of single-vision distance spectacles led to improvements in landing control, consistent with individuals' being more certain regarding the precise height of the lower floor level. This enhanced control was attributed to having a view of the foot, step edge, and immediate floor area that was not blurred, magnified, or doubled and that did not suffer from image jump or peripheral distortions. These findings provide further evidence that use of single-vision distance lenses in everyday locomotion may be advantageous for elderly multifocal wearers who have a high risk of falling.