• Expanding training capacity for radiographer reporting using simulation: Evaluation of a pilot academy project

      Harcus, J.W.; Snaith, Beverly (2019-11)
      Introduction: Whilst there is increasing demand on radiology services in the UK, pressures are restricting the expansion of the multi-professional workforce. A pilot academy for radiography reporting was established to augment the traditional university and clinical education in a simulated environment using focussed teaching and real image worklists in a dedicated environment away from departments. Methods: Located at a facility to replicate the clinical reporting environment, the emphasis of the nine-month pilot was to provide extensive ‘hands-on’ training to eight trainees. Evaluation of the academy was undertaken through focus groups, telephone interviews, and online surveys to consider the experiences of the trainees and their managers and mentors. Results: There was overwhelming support for the academy from trainees, mentors, and managers. Key benefits included relieving pressures on department and mentors; providing an intense, structured, and safe environment to learn; and, perhaps most importantly, an extensive and cohesive peer-support network. Issues identified included conflict within departments due to differences in reporting style and the need for greater collaboration between the university, academy, and departments. Conclusion: The use of simulation in education is widely researched, however, there are a number of key factors that need to be considered when implementing it into practise. Peer-support and reflection is seen as essential for its success. Extensive dedicated time to focus on reporting alongside peers can support the development of these skills away from the clinical environment and as such can reduce pressure on service delivery and positively influence learner outcomes.
    • Improving wrist imaging through a multicentre educational intervention: The challenge of orthogonal projections

      Snaith, Beverly; Raine, S.; Fowler, L.; Osborne, C.; House, S.; Holmes, R.; Tattersall, E.; Pierce, E.; Dobson, M.; Harcus, J.W. (2020-09-01)
      In relation to wrist imaging, the accepted requirement is two orthogonal projections obtained at 90°, each with the wrist in neutral position. However, the literature and anecdotal experience suggests that this principle is not universally applied. Method: This multiphase study was undertaken across eight different hospitals sites. Compliance with standard UK technique was confirmed if there was a change in ulna orientation between the dorsi-palmar (DP) and lateral wrist projections. A baseline evaluation for three days was randomly identified from the preceding three months. An educational intervention was implemented using a poster to demonstrate standard positioning. To measure the impact of the intervention, further evaluation took place at two weeks (early) and three months (late). Results: Across the study phases, only a minority of radiographs demonstrated compliance with the standard technique, with an identical anatomical appearance of the distal ulna across the projections. Initial compliance was 16.8% (n = 40/238), and this improved to 47.8% (n = 77/161) post-intervention, but declined to 32.8% (n = 41/125) within three months. The presence of pathology appeared to influence practice, with a greater proportion of those with an abnormal radiographic examination demonstrating a change in ulna appearances in the baseline cohort (p