• Food choice motives, attitude towards and intention to adopt personalised nutrition

      Rankin, A.; Bunting, B.P.; Poinhos, R.; van der Lans, I.A.; Fischer, A.R.H.; Kuznesof, S.; Almeida, M.D.V.; Markovina, Jerko; Frewer, L.J.; Stewart-Knox, Barbara (2018-10)
      The present study explored associations between food choice motives, attitudes towards and intention to adopt personalised nutrition, to inform communication strategies based on consumer priorities and concerns. Design/Setting: A survey was administered online which included the Food Choice Questionnaire (FCQ) and items assessing attitudes towards and intention to adopt personalised nutrition. Subjects: Nationally representative samples were recruited in nine EU countries (n 9381). Results: Structural equation modelling indicated that the food choice motives ‘weight control’, ‘mood’, ‘health’ and ‘ethical concern’ had a positive association and ‘price’ had a negative association with attitude towards, and intention to adopt, personalised nutrition. ‘Health’ was positively associated and ‘familiarity’ negatively associated with attitude towards personalised nutrition. The effects of ‘weight control’, ‘ethical concern’, ‘mood’ and ‘price’ on intention to adopt personalised nutrition were partially mediated by attitude. The effects of ‘health’ and ‘familiarity’ were fully mediated by attitude. ‘Sensory appeal’ was negatively and directly associated with intention to adopt personalised nutrition. Conclusions: Personalised nutrition providers may benefit from taking into consideration the importance of underlying determinants of food choice in potential users, particularly weight control, mood and price, when promoting services and in tailoring communications that are motivationally relevant.
    • Self-efficacy, habit strength, health locus of control and response to the personalised nutrition Food4Me intervention study

      Stewart-Knox, Barbara; Rankin, A.; Bunting, B.P.; Frewer, L.J.; Celis-Morales, C.; Livingstone, K.M.; Fischer, A.R.H.; Poinhos, R.; Kuznesof, S.; Gibney, M.J.; et al. (Emerald, 2021)
      Purpose – Randomised controlled trials identify causal links between variables but not why an outcome has occurred. This analysis sought to determine how psychological factors assessed at baseline influenced response to personalised nutrition. Design/methodology/approach – Web-based, randomised, controlled trial (RCT) was conducted across seven European countries. Volunteers, both male and female, aged over 18 years were randomised to either a non-personalised (control) or a personalised (treatment) dietary advice condition. Linear mixed model analysis with fixed effects was used to compare associations between internal and external health locus of control (HLoC), nutrition self-efficacy (NS-E) and self-report habit index (S-RHI) at baseline (N 5 1444), with healthy eating index (HEI) and Mediterranean diet index (MDI) scores between conditions post-intervention (N 5 763). Findings – An increase in MDI scores was observed between baseline and six months in the treatment group which was associated with higher NS-E (p