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dc.contributor.advisorThornton, M. Julie
dc.contributor.advisorKatsikogianni, Maria G.
dc.contributor.advisorChang, Chien-Yi
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Paul A.
dc.date.accessioned2024-06-26T15:54:07Z
dc.date.available2024-06-26T15:54:07Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/19912
dc.description.abstractA silent pandemic, chronic, non-healing wounds are a major cause of morbidity, with treatment and management representing significant health burdens. The opportunistic pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most common species isolated from chronic wounds. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a biocompatible and, inexpensive to fabricate polymer, can undergo various modifications. The ability of the produced polymers to attract S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, either from the planktonic state, or while sessile in biofilms on ex vivo skin, was investigated using flat (FL) or patterned (PT) PDMS with or without 1% or 10% triclosan Patterned PDMS + 10% triclosan (PT 10%) attracted significantly more live S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, as determined using Colony Forming Unit (CFU) analysis (*p<0.01), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) (*p<0.01) and Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM) (*p<0.01). The released triclosan was not cytotoxic against either bacteria or primary cultures of human dermal fibroblasts using Water Soluble Tetrazolium Salts (WST-1) assay. High performance liquid chromatography analysis highlights low level of triclosan release from the PDMS. Bacterial infection in co-culture using the Boyden chamber assay increased fibroblast viability in the presence of PDMS (*p<0.05). PT 10% demonstrated superior biofilm transfer from epidermis (*p<0.05), in comparison to all other analysed polymers. In summary, the unique topography of PDMS combined with triclosan attracted bacteria most efficiently. This promising data suggests potential for engineering a patterned polymer to physically transfer biofilms from wounds, and importantly lacks bactericidal properties which is vital in the quest to combat antimicrobial resistance.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectChronic wounden_US
dc.subjectBacteriaen_US
dc.subjectDermal fibroblasten_US
dc.subjectPolydimethylsiloxaneen_US
dc.subjectTriclosanen_US
dc.subjectPathogenic biofilmsen_US
dc.titleSurface Engineered Novel Patterned Polymers to Remove Pathogenic Biofilms from Human Skin. Effective Removal of Antimicrobial Resistant Bacteria from Chronic Woundsen_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentCentre for Skin Sciences. School of Chemistry and Biosciences. Faculty of Life Sciencesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2023
refterms.dateFOA2024-06-26T15:54:07Z


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