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dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Sally E.
dc.contributor.advisorStewart-Knox, Barbara
dc.contributor.advisorLesk, Valerie E.
dc.contributor.authorAdegbayi, Adenike
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-06T15:49:09Z
dc.date.available2024-02-06T15:49:09Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/19797
dc.description.abstractExclusive breastfeeding and holistic maternity care are strategic to improving maternal and infant health outcomes in Nigeria. This thesis aimed at informing policies and interventions to promote breastfeeding and to improve Nigerian mother’s experiences in antenatal and intrapartum care. The study in this research focused upon psychological dynamics underlying societal culture around maternity and breastfeeding. Using quantitative method, attitudes toward breastfeeding and health orientation were surveyed in 400 Nigerian men and women using the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale (IIFAS) and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLoC). There were more positive attitudes toward breastfeeding in males, participants in the 20-29-year-old age category, and in those who identified as single. Higher internal HLoC was associated with more positive attitudes to breastfeeding and higher EHLoC scores were associated with more negative attitudes to formula feeding. The second study explored the experience of pregnancy and childbirth in Nigerian women. Qualitative interviews with 12 women implied that Nigerian women perceive pregnancy and childbirth as a multidimensional experience comprising physiological and psychological elements and also as risky. Control mechanisms that reflected internal HLoC included choosing multiple antenatal care sources to obtain holistic care, adopting new technology in bridging perceived communication gaps with health care providers and adopting physical and mental strategies in controlling the somatic and sensory changes that accompany pregnancy. Pregnancy and childbirth were viewed through an external HLoC lens as spiritual, and reflected in an entrenched belief in the intervention of deity to mitigate pain and risk associated with childbirth. These results have implications for practice, intervention and policy to promote breastfeeding at the societal level and improve maternity services for the current and next child-bearing generation.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectInfant feeding attitudesen_US
dc.subjectHealth locus of controlen_US
dc.subjectIowa infant feeding attitude scaleen_US
dc.subjectMulti-dimensional health locus of control scaleen_US
dc.subjectPregnancyen_US
dc.subjectChildbirthen_US
dc.subjectNigeriaen_US
dc.subjectBreastfeedingen_US
dc.subjectQualitativeen_US
dc.subjectSurveyen_US
dc.titlePregnancy, Transition to Motherhood, Infant Feeding Attitudes and Health Locus of Control in Nigeriaen_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentDivision of Psychology Faculty of Management, Law and Social Sciencesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2022
refterms.dateFOA2024-02-06T15:49:09Z


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