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dc.contributor.authorJones, Danielle K.
dc.contributor.authorDrewery, Rachael
dc.contributor.authorWindle, Karen
dc.contributor.authorHumphrey, S.
dc.contributor.authorFonseca de Paiva, Andreia
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-10T08:17:30Z
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-19T07:38:38Z
dc.date.available2023-07-10T08:17:30Z
dc.date.available2023-07-19T07:38:38Z
dc.date.issued2023-08-07
dc.identifier.citationJones DK, Drewery R, Windle K et al (2023) Dementia Prevention and the General Practitioners’ role: a qualitative interview study. British Journal of General Practice. Accepted for publication.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/19515
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: General Practitioners (GPs) play an increasingly important role in proactively preventing dementia. 40% of dementia cases could be prevented or delayed by targeting 12 modifiable risk factors throughout life. However, little is known about how GPs perceive their role in dementia prevention and associated barriers. Aims: To explore the role of GPs in dementia prevention. Design and Setting: A qualitative study among UK GPs. Method: Semi-structured online interviews with 11 UK GPs exploring their views regarding their role in dementia prevention. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: GPs reported that they never explicitly discuss dementia risk with patients, even when patients are presenting with risk factors, but acknowledge that dementia prevention should be part of their role. They advocate for adopting a whole team approach to primary care preventative practice, using long-term condition/medication reviews or NHS health checks as a platform to enable dementia risk communication targeting already at-risk individuals. Barriers included a lack of time, an absence of knowledge and education about the modifiable dementia risk factors, as well as a reluctance to use dementia as a term within the appointment for fear of causing health anxiety. Brain health was perceived as offering a more encouraging discursive tool for primary care practitioners, supporting communication and behaviour change. Conclusion: There needs to be whole systems shift towards prioritising brain health and supporting primary care professionals in their preventative role. Education is key to underpinning this role in dementia prevention.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights(c) 2023 The Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed under the Creative Commons CC-BY license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)en_US
dc.subjectDementiaen_US
dc.subjectPreventionen_US
dc.subjectRisk reductionen_US
dc.subjectBrain healthen_US
dc.subjectGeneral practiceen_US
dc.subjectPrimary careen_US
dc.titleDementia Prevention and the General Practitioners’ role: a qualitative interview studyen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2023-06-26
dc.contributor.sponsorThe University of Bradford, SURE funding scheme (reference: DA512
dc.date.application2023-07-04
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3399/BJGP.2023.0103
dc.rights.licenseCC-BYen_US
dc.date.updated2023-07-10T08:17:32Z
refterms.dateFOA2023-07-19T07:38:57Z
dc.openaccess.statusopenAccessen_US


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