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dc.contributor.authorDyson, C.J.
dc.contributor.authorPriest, Martin
dc.contributor.authorLee, P.M.
dc.date.accessioned2022-12-09T17:25:13Z
dc.date.accessioned2023-01-12T15:24:46Z
dc.date.available2022-12-09T17:25:13Z
dc.date.available2023-01-12T15:24:46Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.citationDyson CJ, Priest M and Lee PM (2023) The flow of lubricant as a mist in the piston assembly and crankcase of a fired gasoline engine. Tribology Letters. 71: Article 12.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/19282
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractThe tribological performance of the piston assembly of an automotive engine is highly influenced by the complex flow mechanisms that supply lubricant to the upper piston rings. As well as affecting friction and wear, the oil consumption and emissions of the engine are strongly influenced by these mechanisms. There is a significant body of work that seeks to model these flows effectively. However, these models are not able to fully describe the flow of lubricant through the piston assembly. Some experimental studies indicate that droplets of lubricant carried in the gas flows through the piston assembly may account for some of this. This work describes an investigation into the nature of lubricant misting in a fired gasoline engine. Previous work in a laboratory simulator showed that the tendency of a lubricant to form mist is dependent on the viscosity of the lubricant and the type and concentration of viscosity modifier. The higher surface area-to-volume ratio of the lubricant if more droplets are formed or if the droplets are smaller is hypothesised to increase the degradation rate of the lubricant. The key work in the investigation was to measure the size distribution of the droplets in the crankcase of a fired gasoline engine. Droplets were extracted from the crankcase and passed through a laser diffraction particle sizer. Three characteristic droplet size ranges were observed: Spray sized (250–1000 μm); Major mist (30–250 μm); and Minor mist (0.1–30 μm). Higher base oil viscosity tended to reduce the proportion of mist-sized droplets. The viscoelasticity contributed by a polymeric viscosity modifier reduced the proportion of mist droplets, especially at high load.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2022. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.subjectCrankcase lubricanten_US
dc.subjectDroplet formationen_US
dc.subjectViscosity modifiersen_US
dc.subjectViscosity index improversen_US
dc.subjectDroplet size distributionen_US
dc.subjectLaser diffraction particle size measurementen_US
dc.titleThe flow of lubricant as a mist in the piston assembly and crankcase of a fired gasoline engineen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2022-12-02
dc.date.application2022-12-09
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11249-022-01686-0
dc.rights.licenseCC-BYen_US
dc.date.updated2022-12-09T17:25:15Z
refterms.dateFOA2023-01-12T15:25:26Z
dc.openaccess.statusopenAccessen_US


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