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dc.contributor.advisorOzkan, Aydin
dc.contributor.advisorPinto, Helena
dc.contributor.advisorElshandidy, Tamer
dc.contributor.advisorLi, Jing
dc.contributor.authorKhawar, Muhammad
dc.date.accessioned2022-12-06T14:34:12Z
dc.date.available2022-12-06T14:34:12Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/19239
dc.description.abstractThis research reviews the existing Tax Planning (TP) measures and explores the consistency of UK firms’ engagement in TP; evaluates incentives for TP and its value relevance in a signalling theory framework; and studies corporate governance effects on TP for the firms in an institutional theory framework. It analyses a unique set of 1,482 hand-collected firm-year observations and proposes ‘undisclosed TP’ as a new TP measure. It finds that firms consistently engage in TP and their TP disclosures have improved; internationally oriented firms do not engage in TP to save taxes; risky firms, firms with low operating cashflows and growing firms, however, do not engage in TP to arrange funds internally – so they signal their non-engagement in TP to the market. Further findings confirm public awareness and market valuation of firms’ TP engagements. Boards’ tax affiliations result in reductions in tax payments (expenses) for strongly (weakly) governed firms. Professional accountancy qualifications on the board result in significantly higher tax payments for weakly governed firms. The auditors’ provided tax services (institutional ownership) result in higher tax payments for weakly (strongly) governed firms suggesting supplementary (complementary) role of auditors (institutional ownership) for the internal governance on TP. This research concludes that there is a need for further TP disclosures to reduce the information asymmetry associated with negatively valued TP activities; recommends auditors’ involvement in TP services; and recommends tax affiliates on the board to bring tax savings in a strongly governed environment. The current study’s findings have important theoretical and practical implications.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Bradforden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectCorporate tax planningen_US
dc.subjectIncentives and governance effectsen_US
dc.subjectTax planningen_US
dc.subjectTax avoidanceen_US
dc.subjectCorporate governanceen_US
dc.subjectSignalling theoryen_US
dc.subjectInstitutional theoryen_US
dc.subjectMeasurementen_US
dc.titleCorporate Tax Planning: Measurement, Incentives and Governance Effectsen_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentFaculty of Management Law and Social Sciencesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2020
refterms.dateFOA2022-12-06T14:34:12Z


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