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dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, A.
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Rob
dc.contributor.authorHaythorne, R.
dc.contributor.authorKelly, G.
dc.contributor.authorMatu, J.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, T.
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, K.
dc.contributor.authorHindle, L.
dc.contributor.authorElls, L.
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-04T09:28:13Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-30T08:16:39Z
dc.date.available2022-11-04T09:28:13Z
dc.date.available2022-11-30T08:16:39Z
dc.date.issued2023-06
dc.identifier.citationGriffiths A, Brooks R, Haythorne R et al (2023) The Impact of Allied Health Professionals on the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Obesity in Young Children: A Scoping Review. Clinical Obesity. 13(3): e12571.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/19229
dc.descriptionYes
dc.description.abstractAllied Health Professionals (AHPs) have the capacity to promote healthy behaviours in young children through routine ‘contact points’, as well as structured weight management programmes. This scoping review aims to evaluate the impact of AHPs in the prevention of obesity in young children. Methods: Databases were searched for relevant evidence between 1st January 2000 and 17th January 2022. Eligibility criteria included primary evidence (including, but not limited to; randomised controlled trials, observational studies, service evaluations) evaluating the impact of AHPs on the primary and secondary prevention of obesity in young children (mean age under five years old). Results: AHP related interventions typically demonstrated improvements in outcomes such as nutritional behaviour (e.g., lower sweetened drink intake), with some reductions in screen time. However, changes in weight outcomes (e.g., Body Mass Index (BMI) z score, BMI) in response to an AHP intervention were inconsistent. There was insufficient data to determine moderating effects, however tentative evidence suggests that those with a lower socioeconomic status or living in an underprivileged area may be more likely to lose weight following an AHP intervention. There was no evidence identified evaluating how AHPs use routine ‘contact points’ in the prevention of obesity in young children. Conclusion: AHP interventions could be effective in optimising weight and nutritional outcomes in young children. However, more research is required to determine how routine AHP contact points, across the range of professional groups may be used in the prevention of obesity in young children.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights©2023 The Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed under the Creative Commons CC-BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
dc.subjectNutrition
dc.subjectWeight management
dc.subjectAllied health professionals
dc.subjectChildhood obesity
dc.subjectExercise
dc.subjectPhysical activity
dc.titleThe Impact of Allied Health Professionals on the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Obesity in Young Children: A Scoping Review
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.date.Accepted2022-11-02
dc.date.application2022-11-30
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionPublished version
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/cob.12571
dc.rights.licenseCC-BY
dc.date.updated2022-11-04T09:28:17Z
refterms.dateFOA2022-11-30T08:16:54Z
dc.openaccess.statusopenAccess


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