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dc.contributor.advisorKelly, Rhys H.F.
dc.contributor.advisorPotts, David J.
dc.contributor.advisorPankhurst, Donna T.
dc.contributor.authorNtumva, Mabebe E.
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-28T11:05:12Z
dc.date.available2022-07-28T11:05:12Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/19080
dc.description.abstractThis study applies a qualitative approach in examining the stakeholder perspectives on the causes and impacts of, and responses to, the farmer-pastoralist conflicts. The study is primarily a response to the broader stakeholder concerns surrounding the farmer-pastoralist conflicts in the Kilosa district of Tanzania. The interdisciplinary approach and, more importantly, the environmental security and political ecology theories, were used for conflict analysis in a bid to determine the gaps in the existing body of the literature. Specifically, the study aimed at determining: first, the causes of the conflicts in question driven by the growing concern around the increasing land conflicts between farmers and pastoralists in the district; second, the impacts of the conflicts and respective implications to the causes and conflict management mechanisms; third, the relevance of the conflict management mechanisms in place. The study adopted a case study design drawing from a range of qualitative methods involving semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis for collecting and analysing the stakeholder perspectives obtained from the field. The study then reveals that farmer-pastoralist conflicts in Kilosa district are mainly grounded in the broader domestic and external socio-political forces. The escalation into violence, however, depends mostly on resource scarcity driven by climate change manifesting as drought. In this regard, the lone environmental scarcity-conflict nexus is found to be less significant in causing farmer-pastoralist conflicts in Kilosa, a finding underpinning the political ecology’s structural influence. The study finds that the use of multistakeholder bricolage institutions is more relevant for addressing these conflicts in Kilosa district.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCommonwealth Scholarship Commissionen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.en_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectConflict analysisen_US
dc.subjectConflict managementen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmentalen_US
dc.subjectFarmer-pastoralisten_US
dc.subjectLand conflicten_US
dc.subjectResource scarcityen_US
dc.subjectTanzaniaen_US
dc.subjectConflicten_US
dc.titleFarmer-pastoralist conflicts in the Kilosa district of Tanzania: A qualitative study of stakeholder perspectives on causes, impacts and responsesen_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentDivision of Peace Studies and International Development, Faculty of Management, Law and Social Sciencesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2020
refterms.dateFOA2022-07-28T11:05:12Z


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