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dc.contributor.authorUgail, Hassan
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-20T06:29:58Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-29T06:56:01Z
dc.date.available2022-03-20T06:29:58Z
dc.date.available2022-04-29T06:56:01Z
dc.date.issued2009-01
dc.identifier.citationUgail H (2009) Partial Differential Equations for Modelling Wound Geometry. In: Bioengineering Research of Chronic Wounds. Studies in Mechanobiology, Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials. Vol 1: 101-125.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18948
dc.descriptionNoen_US
dc.description.abstractWounds arising from various conditions are painful, embarrassing and often requires treatment plans which are costly. A crucial task, during the treatment of wounds is the measurement of the size, area and volume of the wounds. This enables to provide appropriate objective means of measuring changes in the size or shape of wounds, in order to evaluate the efficiency of the available therapies in an appropriate fashion. Conventional techniques for measuring physical properties of a wound require making some form of physical contact with it. We present a method to model a wide variety of geometries of wound shapes. The shape modelling is based on formulating mathematical boundary-value problems relating to solutions of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). In order to model a given geometric shape of the wound a series of boundary functions which correspond to the main features of the wound are selected. These boundary functions are then utilised to solve an elliptic PDE whose solution results in the geometry of the wound shape. Thus, here we show how low order elliptic PDEs, such as the Biharmonic equation subject to suitable boundary conditions can be used to model complex wound geometry. We also utilise the solution of the chosen PDE to automatically compute various physical properties of the wound such as the surface area, volume and mass. To demonstrate the methodology a series of examples are discussed demonstrating the capability of the method to produce good representative shapes of wounds.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEllipticen_US
dc.subjectPartial differential equationen_US
dc.subjectPressure ulceren_US
dc.subjectSubdivision schemeen_US
dc.subjectSurface patchen_US
dc.titlePartial Differential Equations for Modelling Wound Geometryen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repositoryen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-00534-3_5
dc.rights.licenseUnspecifieden_US
dc.date.updated2022-03-20T06:29:59Z
dc.openaccess.statusclosedAccessen_US


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