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dc.contributor.authorDavison, J.
dc.contributor.authorBunting, B.
dc.contributor.authorConnolly, P.
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, K.
dc.contributor.authorDunne, L.
dc.contributor.authorStewart-Knox, Barbara
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T09:51:08Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-14T11:27:16Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T09:51:08Z
dc.date.available2022-02-14T11:27:16Z
dc.date.issued2022-08
dc.identifier.citationDavison J, Bunting B, Connolly P et al (2022) Less screen time, more frequent fruit and vegetable intake, and physical activity are associated with greater mental wellbeing in adolescents. Child Indicators Research. 15 (4): 1339-1378.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18745
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractWellbeing declines during adolescence, for which the reasons are unclear. This analysis explored associations between wellbeing and multiple lifestyle, socioeconomic and school-level factors in young people. Data were collected as part of the Wellbeing in School (WiSe) survey of adolescent school children in Northern Ireland at age 13-14 years (N=1618; 49% female) and 15-16 years (N=1558; 50.5% female). Wellbeing was assessed using the short-form Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (sWEMWBS), where scores declined between time one (13-14 years) and time two (15-16 years) in both sexes and were significantly lower in females at both timepoints. Multilevel, multivariate modelling was therefore undertaken separately for males and females with sWEMWBS scores as the dependent variable. Physical activity, family affluence, fruit and vegetable intake, social media use, sleep duration, school factors (size and type) and religion were independent variables. More frequent physical activity in both sexes at both timepoints was associated with higher sWEMWBS scores. In females, higher sWEMWBS scores were associated with less social media use at time one (and marginally at time two), greater family affluence at time two, and being Catholic at both timepoints. In males, higher sWEMWBS scores were associated with more frequent fruit and vegetable intake at time one. Mental wellbeing was unrelated to sleep duration or school factors in either sex, at both time points. Efforts to maximize mental wellbeing in adolescents should promote engagement in physical activity and implement sex-specific interventions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. This material is based upon work conducted as part of the Wellbeing in Schools (WiSe) study which was financially supported by the Centre of Excellence for Public Health (Northern Ireland), and the Centre of Evidence and Social Innovation, at Queens University Belfast.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s12187-022-09924-6en_US
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licen ses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.subjectMental wellbeingen_US
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_US
dc.subjectFruit and vegetablesen_US
dc.subjectFamily affluenceen_US
dc.subjectSocial mediaen_US
dc.subjectSleepen_US
dc.titleLess screen time, more frequent fruit and vegetable intake, and physical activity are associated with greater mental wellbeing in adolescentsen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2022-01-31
dc.date.application2022-02-08
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2022-02-03T09:51:10Z
refterms.dateFOA2022-02-14T11:28:07Z
dc.openaccess.statusGolden_US


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