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dc.contributor.authorYamoah, F.A.
dc.contributor.authorSivarajah, Uthayasankar
dc.contributor.authorMahroof, Kamran
dc.contributor.authorGonzález Peña, I.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-14T14:03:33Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T10:01:35Z
dc.date.available2021-12-14T14:03:33Z
dc.date.available2021-12-23T10:01:35Z
dc.date.issued2022-02
dc.identifier.citationYamoah FA, Sivarajah U, Mahroof K et al (2022) Demystifying Corporate Inertia Towards Transition to Circular Economy: A Management Frame of Reference. International Journal of Production Economics. 244: 108388.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18713
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractWe examine corporate inertia towards circularity transition using organisational case studies, observations, and qualitative interviews with business executives. The study explores how the values and beliefs of business leaders and managers promote or inhibit internal and external stakeholder engagement to enable transition to circular business models. We focus on four large UK food companies, conducting interviews with 11 senior managers. Rather than a lack of awareness of the circular economy (CE), the results demonstrate that business leaders are not persuaded by the short-to medium-term business case for a CE. There is misalignment between values and beliefs of business executives and the circularity values and goals of their organisations. The misaligned values and beliefs inhibit relevant stakeholder engagement for transitions to a CE with responsibility shifted to civil society and public institutions. Management commitment to circularity transitions are at best a sophisticated form of circularity greenwashing. The study further suggests a general lack of collective disposition to foster collaborations with sectoral and supply chain partners to engender circularity transitions due to the absence of any standard systems for CE performance indicators. Circularity education and training play a positive mediatory role in changing negative assumptions, including the promotion of managers' engagement with other relevant stakeholders to build synergies and strategies for CE systems. The findings contribute to understanding the dynamics of corporate inertia regarding transitions to CE and highlight the relevance of aligning the personal values and beliefs of top management with organisational, sectoral, and supply chain partners’ values and goals.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2021.108388en_US
dc.rights© 2022 Elsevier. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)en_US
dc.subjectCircular economyen_US
dc.subjectValues and beliefs alignmenten_US
dc.subjectTop management commitmenten_US
dc.subjectStakeholder engagementen_US
dc.subjectCircularity educationen_US
dc.titleDemystifying Corporate Inertia Towards Transition to Circular Economy: A Management Frame of Referenceen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2021-12-07
dc.date.application2021-12-09
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.EndofEmbargo2023-06-09
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.description.publicnotesThe full-text of this article will be released for public view at the end of the publisher embargo on 9 Jun 2023.en_US
dc.date.updated2021-12-14T14:03:36Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-12-23T10:02:00Z
dc.openaccess.statusGreenen_US


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