Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDowns, Murna G.
dc.contributor.advisorOyebode, Jan R.
dc.contributor.authorHaunch, Kirsty J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-07T15:40:45Z
dc.date.available2021-12-07T15:40:45Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18670
dc.description.abstractBackground: People living with advanced dementia in nursing homes often spend the majority of time alone, with little contact with anyone. The need to connect with others is a central part of a philosophy known as Person Centred Dementia Care. A significant body of literature demonstrates the effectiveness of a range of approaches that facilitate connections, yet, we know little about staff perspectives on what facilitates them to connect on a daily basis. Aim: To develop a Grounded Theory to explain what facilitates nursing home staff to connect with residents living with advanced dementia. Methods: Semi structured interviews were conducted with nursing home staff (n=21) and relatives (n=5) from seven nursing homes. Following Strauss and Corbin’s (1990, 1998) Interpretivist Grounded Theory methodology, data collection and analysis proceeded iteratively, and theoretical sampling was used to develop the emergent theory. Results: The Grounded Theory ‘making the most of time’ explains that most connections occurred during personal care. Interdependent contextual and individual factors facilitated staff to make the most of time. Effective leaders were described to create a caring culture in which informal leaders (experienced staff) acted as role models. Staff were then more likely to understand, accept and tolerate dementia, know connections were part of their role, get to know residents and express caring values. In the right physical environment, this then facilitated staff to make the most of time during personal care. Increased training and education from specialised dementia units and experiential knowledge from family engagement then supplement such contexts. Implications: Future research could empirically test the theory ‘making the most of time’en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectAdvanced dementiaen_US
dc.subjectCare homesen_US
dc.subjectNursing homesen_US
dc.subjectSocial isolationen_US
dc.subjectConnectingen_US
dc.subjectInteractingen_US
dc.subjectSocial exclusionen_US
dc.subjectStaffen_US
dc.subjectNursesen_US
dc.subjectCare assistantsen_US
dc.titleMaking the most of time: A Grounded Theory to explain what facilitates nursing home staff to connect with residents living with advanced dementiaen_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentFaculty of Health Studiesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2018
refterms.dateFOA2021-12-07T15:40:45Z


Item file(s)

Thumbnail
Name:
17.10.19 Final CORRECTIONS Master ...
Size:
3.814Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
PhD Thesis

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record