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dc.contributor.authorLamming, Laura
dc.contributor.authorMontague, Jane
dc.contributor.authorCrosswaite, Kate
dc.contributor.authorFaisal, Muhammad
dc.contributor.authorMcDonach, E.
dc.contributor.authorMohammed, A. Mohammed
dc.contributor.authorCracknell, A.
dc.contributor.authorLovatt, A.
dc.contributor.authorSlater, B.
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-05T09:53:13Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-11T12:28:31Z
dc.date.available2021-10-05T09:53:13Z
dc.date.available2021-10-11T12:28:31Z
dc.date.issued2021-10-01
dc.identifier.citationLamming L, Montague J, Crosswaite K et al (2021) Fidelity and the impact of patient safety huddles on teamwork and safety culture: an evaluation of the Huddle Up for Safer Healthcare (HUSH) project. BMC Health Services Research. 21(1): 1038.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18615
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractThe Patient Safety Huddle (PSH) is a brief multidisciplinary daily meeting held to discuss threats to patient safety and actions to mitigate risk. Despite growing interest and application of huddles as a mechanism for improving safety, evidence of their impact remains limited. There is also variation in how huddles are conceived and implemented with insufficient focus on their fidelity (the extent to which delivered as planned) and potential ways in which they might influence outcomes. The Huddle Up for Safer Healthcare (HUSH) project attempted to scale up the implementation of patient safety huddles (PSHs) in five hospitals - 92 wards - across three UK NHS Trusts. This paper aims to assess their fidelity, time to embed, and impact on teamwork and safety culture. A multi-method Developmental Evaluation was conducted. The Stages of Implementation Checklist (SIC) was used to determine time taken to embed PSHs. Observations were used to check embedded status and fidelity of PSH. A Teamwork and Safety Climate survey (TSC) was administered at two time-points: pre- and post-embedding. Changes in TSC scores were calculated for Trusts, job role and clinical speciality. Observations confirmed PSHs were embedded in 64 wards. Mean fidelity score was 4.9/9. PSHs frequently demonstrated a 'fear free' space while Statistical Process Control charts and historical harms were routinely omitted. Analysis showed a positive change for the majority (26/27) of TSC questions and the overall safety grade of the ward. PSHs are feasible and effective for improving teamwork and safety culture, especially for nurses. PSH fidelity criteria may need adjusting to include factors deemed most useful by frontline staff. Future work should examine inter-disciplinary and role-based differences in TSC outcomes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Health Foundation’s Scaling Up Improvement Programme: Round One (2015)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-021-07080-1en_US
dc.rights(c) 2021 The Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed under the Creative Commons CC-BY licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)en_US
dc.subjectHuddle Up for Safer Healthcareen_US
dc.subjectHUSHen_US
dc.subjectPatient safetyen_US
dc.titleFidelity and the impact of patient safety huddles on teamwork and safety culture: an evaluation of the Huddle Up for Safer Healthcare (HUSH) project.en_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2021-09-10
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2021-10-05T09:53:15Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-10-11T12:29:00Z
dc.openaccess.statusGolden_US


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