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dc.contributor.authorTatterton, Michael J.
dc.contributor.authorHonour, A.
dc.contributor.authorBillington, D.
dc.contributor.authorKirkby, L.
dc.contributor.authorLyon, J.A.
dc.contributor.authorLyon, N.
dc.contributor.authorGaskin, G.
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-02T19:13:21Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-11T09:17:09Z
dc.date.available2021-10-02T19:13:21Z
dc.date.available2021-10-11T09:17:09Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationTatterton MJ, Honour A, Billington D et al (2021) Moving and handling and managing physiological deterioration of deceased children in hospice cool rooms: practice guidelines for care after death. Nursing Children and Young People. Accepted for publication.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18614
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractChildren’s hospices provide a range of services for babies, children and young people who have life-shortening conditions, including care after death in specialist ‘cool bedrooms’. Caring for children after death is a challenging area of hospice care, with variation seen within, and between organisations. The study aims to identify current practices and to produce guidelines that promote safe practice in moving and handling and managing physiological deterioration of children after death. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all 54 British children’s hospices; 33 responded (=62% of hospices). Variation in the way in which children’s hospices delivered care after death was identified, in terms of the length of stay, care provision and equipment used, owing to demands of individual families and the experience and confidence of practitioners. Internal variation in practice can lead to practitioner anxiety, and risk-taking when providing care, particularly in the presence of family members. Practice recommendations have been made that reflect the practical demands of caring for a child’s body after death; these have been split into two parts: moving and handling considerations and managing physiological deterioration. These recommendations should be used to support the development of policy and practice, allowing organisations to standardise staff expectations and to support practitioners when caring for children after death.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights(c) 2021 RCN. Full-text reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.en_US
dc.subjectBereavementen_US
dc.subjectCare after deathen_US
dc.subjectContinuing professional developmenten_US
dc.subjectEvidence-based practiceen_US
dc.subjectFamily centred careen_US
dc.subjectHospiceen_US
dc.subjectMoving and handlingen_US
dc.subjectPalliative careen_US
dc.subjectPractice developmenten_US
dc.subjectStaff supporten_US
dc.titleMoving and handling and managing physiological deterioration of deceased children in hospice cool rooms: practice guidelines for care after deathen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2021-08-11
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.date.updated2021-10-02T19:13:22Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-10-11T09:18:27Z
dc.openaccess.statusGreenen_US


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