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dc.contributor.authorReilly, Siobhan T.
dc.contributor.authorHarding, A.J.E.
dc.contributor.authorMorbey, H.
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, F.
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, P.R.
dc.contributor.authorSwarbrick, C.
dc.contributor.authorLeroi, I.
dc.contributor.authorDavies, L.
dc.contributor.authorReeves, D.
dc.contributor.authorHolland, F.
dc.contributor.authorHann, M.
dc.contributor.authorKeady, J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-29T17:01:35Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-25T15:30:53Z
dc.date.available2021-07-29T17:01:35Z
dc.date.available2021-08-25T15:30:53Z
dc.date.issued2020-07
dc.identifier.citationReilly ST, Harding AJE, Morbey H et al (2020) What is important to people with dementia living at home? A set of core outcome items for use in the evaluation of non-pharmacological community-based health and social care interventions. Age and Ageing. 49(4): 664-671.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18579
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Inconsistency in outcome measurement in dementia care trials impedes the comparisons of effectiveness between trials. The key aim of this study is to establish an agreed standardised core outcome set (COS) for use when evaluating non-pharmacological health and social care interventions for people with dementia living at home. Method: We used a mixed-methods research design, including substantive qualitative research with five key stakeholders groups. We consulted with people living with dementia for many aspects of this research. We applied a modified two-round 54 item Delphi approach to attain consensus on core outcomes. The COS was finalised in a face-to-face consensus meeting in 2018. Results: Of the 288 who completed round 1 (21 people living with dementia, 58 care partners, 137 relevant health and social care professionals, 60 researchers, 12 policy makers), 246 completed round 2 (85% response rate). Twenty participants attended the consensus meeting. We reached consensus for the inclusion of 13 outcome items. Conclusion: We identified 13 outcome items which are considered core; many relate to social health. Providing there are adequate measures, measuring these core outcome items will enhance comparisons for effectiveness making trial evidence more useful. The items will provide commissioners and service planners with information on what types of interventions are most likely to be valued highly by people living with dementia.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded jointly by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). ESRC is part of UK Research and Innovation.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afaa015en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.subjectCore outcome seten_US
dc.subjectDementiaen_US
dc.subjectNon-pharmacologicalen_US
dc.subjectPsychosocialen_US
dc.subjectOutcomesen_US
dc.subjectOlder peopleen_US
dc.titleWhat is important to people with dementia living at home? A set of core outcome items for use in the evaluation of non-pharmacological community-based health and social care interventionsen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2019-12-16
dc.date.application2020-02-17
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2021-07-29T16:01:36Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-08-25T15:33:24Z
dc.openaccess.statusGolden_US


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