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dc.contributor.authorStacey, T.
dc.contributor.authorHaith-Cooper, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorAlmas, Nisa
dc.contributor.authorKenyon, C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-01T17:53:05Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-09T11:35:13Z
dc.date.available2021-06-01T17:53:05Z
dc.date.available2021-06-09T11:35:13Z
dc.date.issued2021-05
dc.identifier.citationStacey T, Haith-Cooper M, Almas N et al (2021) An exploration of migrant women’s perceptions of public health messages to reduce stillbirth in the UK: a qualitative study. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 21: 394.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18509
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Stillbirth is a global public health priority. Within the United Kingdom, perinatal mortality disproportionately impacts Black, Asian and minority ethnic women, and in particular migrant women. Although the explanation for this remains unclear, it is thought to be multidimensional. Improving perinatal mortality is reliant upon raising awareness of stillbirth and its associated risk factors, as well as improving maternity services. The aim of this study was to explore migrant women’s awareness of health messages to reduce stillbirth risk, and how key public health messages can be made more accessible. Method: Two semi-structured focus groups and 13 one to one interviews were completed with a purposive sample of 30 migrant women from 18 countries and across 4 NHS Trusts. Results: Participants provided an account of their general awareness of stillbirth and recollection of the advice they had been given to reduce the risk of stillbirth both before and during pregnancy. They also suggested approaches to how key messages might be more effectively communicated to migrant women. Conclusions: Our study highlights the complexity of discussing stillbirth during pregnancy. The women in this study were found to receive a wide range of advice from family and friends as well as health professionals about how to keep their baby safe in pregnancy, they recommended the development of a range of resources to provide clear and consistent messages. Health professionals, in particular midwives who have developed a trusting relationship with the women will be key to ensuring that public health messages relating to stillbirth reduction are accessible to culturally and linguistically diverse communities.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding was received from the University of Huddersfield internal funding scheme.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-021-03879-2en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2021. Open Access. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.en_US
dc.subjectPregnancyen_US
dc.subjectPublic healthen_US
dc.subjectStillbirth prevention messagesen_US
dc.subjectBlack, Asian and Minority Ethnic womenen_US
dc.subjectMigranten_US
dc.titleAn exploration of migrant women’s perceptions of public health messages to reduce stillbirth in the UK: a qualitative studyen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2021-05-12
dc.date.application2021-05-20
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2021-06-01T16:53:16Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-09T11:36:15Z
dc.openaccess.statusGolden_US


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