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dc.contributor.advisorRogers, Chrissie
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Amy L.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-15T10:52:21Z
dc.date.available2021-04-15T10:52:21Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18434
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis, I explore 42 autistic individuals’ transitions into further and higher education (FHE) in England, drawing on personal experience as well as interview data. I was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome in 1998 at the age of 13. At the age of 15, my mother introduced the topic to me, and autism soon became the foundation of my socio-political identity. The discussion is divided into three themes; stigma and perception management strategies, formal and informal support networks and the interplay of autism with institutional factors. I draw upon Tringo’s (1970) work on the hierarchy of impairment and Goffman’s (1963) work on stigma. Tringo’s (1970) hierarchy of impairment led me to my intra-communal hierarchy of impairment (perpetuated by autistic individuals against autistic individuals) and Goffman’s (1963) work on stigma led me to my four degrees of openness; autistic individuals can be indiscriminately open, or indiscriminately reticent, but openness if relevant, and openness if necessary, are more common strategies. UPIAS’ (1976) work on the social model of disability laid the foundation for my socio-political identity and this thesis. I argue autism has been largely absent from the political arena. I outline how there are four ideals; the ideals of self-regulation, normalcy, ability and independence. Eager to conform to these ideals, eager to self-present as ‘independent’, ‘self-regulating’, ‘normal’ or ‘capable’, some autistic students are reluctant to request support and accommodations, complicating the transition to FHE.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectAutismen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectFurther educationen_US
dc.subjectHigher educationen_US
dc.subjectTransitionen_US
dc.subjectUniversityen_US
dc.subjectCollegeen_US
dc.subjectDisabilityen_US
dc.subjectSelf-presentationen_US
dc.subjectSupporten_US
dc.subjectSelf-regulationen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionsen_US
dc.subjectInstitutional factorsen_US
dc.titleA qualitative exploration of autism and transition into further and higher educationen_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentFaculty of Management, Law and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2019
refterms.dateFOA2021-04-15T10:52:21Z


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