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dc.contributor.authorLiang, M.
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, D.
dc.contributor.authorBurslem, D.F.R.P.
dc.contributor.authorYu, S.
dc.contributor.authorFang, M.
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Joe D.
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, A.F.S.
dc.contributor.authorHelgason, T.
dc.contributor.authorLiu, X.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-18T08:56:19Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-24T16:08:19Z
dc.date.available2021-02-18T08:56:19Z
dc.date.available2021-02-24T16:08:19Z
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.identifier.citationLiang M, Johnson D, Burslem DFRP et al (2020) Soil fungal networks maintain local dominance of ectomycorrhizal trees. Nature Communications. 11: Article number 2636.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18369
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractThe mechanisms regulating community composition and local dominance of trees in species-rich forests are poorly resolved, but the importance of interactions with soil microbes is increasingly acknowledged. Here, we show that tree seedlings that interact via root-associated fungal hyphae with soils beneath neighbouring adult trees grow faster and have greater survival than seedlings that are isolated from external fungal mycelia, but these effects are observed for species possessing ectomycorrhizas (ECM) and not arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Moreover, survival of naturally-regenerating AM seedlings over ten years is negatively related to the density of surrounding conspecific plants, while survival of ECM tree seedlings displays positive density dependence over this interval, and AM seedling roots contain greater abundance of pathogenic fungi than roots of ECM seedlings. Our findings show that neighbourhood interactions mediated by beneficial and pathogenic soil fungi regulate plant demography and community structure in hyperdiverse forests.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (Project No. 2017YFA0605100) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC 31770466 to X.L. and 31870403 to M.L.), and partly supported by awards from the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC NE/M004848/1 and NE/R004986/1). D.J. is also supported by the N8 AgriFood programme.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16507-yen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2020. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.subjectSoil microbesen_US
dc.subjectSoil fungal networksen_US
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectCommunity ecologyen_US
dc.subjectForest ecologyen_US
dc.titleSoil fungal networks maintain local dominance of ectomycorrhizal treesen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2020-05-05
dc.date.application2020-05-26
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2021-02-18T08:56:20Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-02-24T16:09:23Z
dc.openaccess.statusGolden_US


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