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dc.contributor.authorRobson, H.K.
dc.contributor.authorSaul, H.
dc.contributor.authorSteele, Valerie J.
dc.contributor.authorMeadows, J.
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, P.O.
dc.contributor.authorFischer, A.
dc.contributor.authorHeron, Carl P.
dc.contributor.authorCraig, O.E.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-16T16:40:33Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-23T14:40:18Z
dc.date.available2021-02-16T16:40:33Z
dc.date.available2021-02-23T14:40:18Z
dc.date.issued2021-04
dc.identifier.citationRobson HK, Saul H, Steele VJ et al (2021) Organic residue analysis of Early Neolithic 'bog pots' from Denmark demonstrates the processing of wild and domestic foodstuffs. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. 36: 102829.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18363
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractCeramic containers, intentionally deposited into wetlands, offer detailed insights into Early Neolithic culinary practices. Additionally, they are key for ascertaining the Neolithisation process in Denmark since they appear to form a typo-chronological sequence. Here, we use a combination of organic residue analysis (ORA) of pottery alongside Bayesian chronological modelling of the radiocarbon dates obtained on these vessels to explore the initial stages of votive deposition in wetlands, a practice that stretches from the Mesolithic to the onset of Christianity in Northern Europe. We consider 34 Early-Middle Neolithic (c. 3900–2350 cal BC) ‘bog pots’ from Denmark, of which 20 have ORA data, and 26 have been dated directly. Carbonised surface residues and absorbed lipids from powdered sherds were analysed using a combination of bulk carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and GC-combustion-isotope ratio MS (GC-C-IRMS). The molecular and isotopic compositions of the analysed samples revealed the presence of aquatic, ruminant carcass and dairy fats as well as plant waxes with the majority containing mixtures thereof. Dairy fats were present from the onset of the Funnel Beaker culture, whilst aquatic foods, prevalent at the close of the preceding Mesolithic period, continued to be processed in pottery for the following thousand years.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUK Arts and Humanities Research Board Grant B/RG/AN1717/APN14658 (to O.E.C.) and the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council Grant AH/E008232/1 (to C.P.H and O.E.C.) for funding this research. H.K.R. acknowledges the British Academy for funding during the preparation of the manuscript.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2021.102829en_US
dc.rights© 2021 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.en_US
dc.subjectDenmarken_US
dc.subjectEarly Neolithicen_US
dc.subjectFunnel Beaker cultureen_US
dc.subjectPotteryen_US
dc.subjectOrganic residue analysisen_US
dc.subjectBayesian chronological modellingen_US
dc.subjectVotive depositionen_US
dc.titleOrganic residue analysis of Early Neolithic 'bog pots' from Denmark demonstrates the processing of wild and domestic foodstuffsen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2021-01-20
dc.date.application2021-02-16
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.date.EndofEmbargo2022-02-17
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.description.publicnotesThe full-text of this article will be released for public view at the end of the publisher embargo on 17 Feb 2022.en_US
dc.date.updated2021-02-16T16:40:42Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-02-23T14:42:59Z
dc.openaccess.statusGreenen_US


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