Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCharlesworth, Emily
dc.contributor.authorAlderson, Alison J.
dc.contributor.authorde Juan, V.
dc.contributor.authorElliott, David B.
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-21T14:15:28Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-11T12:32:32Z
dc.date.available2020-12-21T14:15:28Z
dc.date.available2021-01-11T12:32:32Z
dc.date.issued2020-09
dc.identifier.citationCharlesworth E, Alderson AJ, de Juan V et al (2020) When is refraction stable following routine cataract surgery? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics. 40(5): 531-539.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18289
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: We systematically reviewed the literature to investigate when refraction is stable following routine cataract surgery implanting monofocal intraocular lenses. Current advice recommends obtaining new spectacles 4–6 weeks following surgery. Due to advancements in surgical techniques, we hypothesised that refractive stability would be achieved earlier, which could have major short-term improvements in quality of life for patients. Methods: Medline, CINAHL, AMED, Embase, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library were searched with key words chosen to find articles, which assessed refraction following uncomplicated cataract surgery. Citation chains and the reference lists of all included papers were searched. Unpublished literature was identified using OpenGrey (www.opengrey.eu). The review considered studies that measured refraction at regular intervals following surgery until stability was achieved. Results: The search identified 6,680 papers. Two reviewers independently screened the abstracts and nine papers were found to fit the criteria, of which five were included in the meta-analysis. The quality of the papers was evaluated using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomised Studies (MINORS) instrument. Meta-analysis of 301 patients’ data of spherical, cylindrical and spherical equivalent correction were performed using Review Manager 5 (RevMan 5.3) (https://revman.cochrane.org/). Refraction at 1-week versus the gold standard of 4-weeks showed no significant difference for sphere data (effect size and 95% confidence interval of; ES = 0.00, 95% CI: −0.17, 0.17; p = 1.00), cylindrical data (ES = +0.06; 95% CI: −0.05, 0.17; p = 0.31), and spherical equivalent (ES = −0.01; 95% CI: −0.12, 0.10; p = 0.90). Heterogeneity was non-significant (I2 en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights© 2020 The Authors. Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of College of Optometrists Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.subjectCataract surgeryen_US
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen_US
dc.subjectSpectaclesen_US
dc.subjectStabilityen_US
dc.subjectSystematic reviewen_US
dc.titleWhen is refraction stable following routine cataract surgery? A systematic review and meta-analysisen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2020-06-24
dc.date.application2020-07-22
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/opo.12719
dc.date.updated2020-12-21T14:15:33Z
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-11T12:33:22Z


Item file(s)

Thumbnail
Name:
opo.12719(1).pdf
Size:
566.5Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Elliott_et_al_OPO_Sep_2020

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record