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dc.contributor.authorMasefield, S.C.
dc.contributor.authorPrady, S.L.
dc.contributor.authorSheldon, T.A.
dc.contributor.authorSmall, Neil A.
dc.contributor.authorJarvis, S.
dc.contributor.authorPickett, K.E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-28T15:55:24Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-10T16:30:26Z
dc.date.available2020-11-28T15:55:24Z
dc.date.available2020-12-10T16:30:26Z
dc.date.issued2020-02
dc.identifier.citationMasefield SC, Prady SL, Sheldon TA et al (2020) The Caregiver Health Effects of Caring for Young Children with Developmental Disabilities: A Meta-analysis. Maternal and Child Health Journal. 24(5): 561-574.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18222
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractMothers of school age and older children with developmental disabilities experience poorer health than mothers of typically developing children. This review assesses the evidence for the effect on mothers' health of caring for young children with developmental disabilities, and the influence of different disability diagnoses and socioeconomic status. Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL were searched. Studies measuring at least one symptom, using a quantitative scale, in mothers of preschool children (0-5 years) with and without a diagnosed developmental disability were selected. Random effects meta-analysis was performed, and predictive intervals reported due to high expected heterogeneity. The meta-analysis included 23 estimates of association from 14 retrospective studies for the outcomes of stress (n = 11), depressive symptoms (n = 9), general health (n = 2) and fatigue (n = 1). Caring for a child with a developmental disability was associated with greater ill health (standardised mean difference 0.87; 95% predictive interval - 0.47, 2.22). The largest association was for mixed developmental disabilities (1.36; - 0.64, 3.36) and smallest for Down syndrome (0.38; - 2.17, 2.92). There was insufficient socioeconomic information to perform subgroup analysis. The small number of studies and data heterogeneity limited the precision of the estimates of association and generalizability of the findings. Mothers of young children with developmental disabilities may have poorer health than those with typically developing children. Research is needed to identify whether the relationship is causal and, if so, interventions that could reduce the negative effect of caregiving.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSarah Masefeld was supported by a match funded studentship from the University of York and the Health e-Research Centre ref PhD2016PP2.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10995-020-02896-5en_US
dc.rights© 2020 This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.subjectSystematic reviewen_US
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen_US
dc.subjectCaregiveren_US
dc.subjectHealthen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental disabilitiesen_US
dc.titleThe Caregiver Health Effects of Caring for Young Children with Developmental Disabilities: A Meta-analysisen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2020-01-31
dc.date.application2020-02-11
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2020-11-28T15:55:26Z
refterms.dateFOA2020-12-10T16:38:46Z


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