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dc.contributor.authorNagy, Liana C.
dc.contributor.authorHorne, M.
dc.contributor.authorFaisal, Muhammad
dc.contributor.authorMohammed, Mohammed A.
dc.contributor.authorBarber, Sally E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-25T12:59:03Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-16T13:40:32Z
dc.date.available2020-08-25T12:59:03Z
dc.date.available2020-09-16T13:40:32Z
dc.date.issued2019-02
dc.identifier.citationNagy LC, Horne M, Faisal M et al (2019) Ethnic differences in sedentary behaviour in 6-8-year-old children during school terms and school holidays: a mixed methods study. BMC Public Health. 19(1): 152.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/18017
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractSedentary behaviour (SB) in childhood is a major public health concern. Little is known about ethnic differences in SB during school and holiday weeks among White British (WB) and South Asian (SA) children, which this study aims to address through investigating inclinometer measured SB and exploring reasons for child engagement in SB. A mixed methods study, comprising of a quantitative investigation with 160, 6-8 years old children and a qualitative study with a subsample of 18 children, six parents and eight teachers was undertaken. Children of WB and SA ethnicity in three schools were invited to wear inclinometers for seven school terms (summer/winter/spring) and seven holidays (winter/spring) days during July 2016-May 2017. Total SB, SB accumulated in bouts > 30 min and breaks in SB were explored using multivariate linear mixed effects models which adjusted for wear time, sex, deprivation, overweight status, season, term, weekday and school. Nine focus groups and two interviews were carried out using the Theoretical Domains Framework to explore SB perceptions among parents, teachers and children. Data were analysed using the Framework Approach. 104/160 children provided 836 valid days of data. Children spent on average eight hours of SB/day during term time and holidays, equating to 60% of their awake time, and had on average 111 SB breaks /day. SA children had 25 fewer SB breaks/ day when compared to WB (p en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by the NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Yorkshire and Humber (NIHR CLAHRC YH).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-6456-3en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2019 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stateden_US
dc.subjectSedentary behaviour, sittingen_US
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_US
dc.subjectactivPALen_US
dc.subjectEthnicityen_US
dc.titleEthnic differences in sedentary behaviour in 6-8-year-old children during school terms and school holidays: a mixed methods studyen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2019-01-18
dc.date.application2019-02-04
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2020-08-25T11:59:08Z
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-16T13:41:26Z


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