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dc.contributor.authorCassidy, S.
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Peter
dc.contributor.authorChapman, P.
dc.contributor.authorRopar, D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-04T15:51:50Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-01T06:11:44Z
dc.date.available2020-06-04T15:51:50Z
dc.date.available2020-07-01T06:11:44Z
dc.date.issued2015-10
dc.identifier.citationCassidy S, Mitchell P, Chapman P et al (2015) Processing of Spontaneous Emotional Responses in Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders Effect of Stimulus Type. Autism Research. 8(5): 534-544.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17887
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractRecent research has shown that adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have difficulty interpreting others' emotional responses, in order to work out what actually happened to them. It is unclear what underlies this difficulty; important cues may be missed from fast paced dynamic stimuli, or spontaneous emotional responses may be too complex for those with ASD to successfully recognise. To explore these possibilities, 17 adolescents and adults with ASD and 17 neurotypical controls viewed 21 videos and pictures of peoples' emotional responses to gifts (chocolate, a handmade novelty or Monopoly money), then inferred what gift the person received and the emotion expressed by the person while eye movements were measured. Participants with ASD were significantly more accurate at distinguishing who received a chocolate or homemade gift from static (compared to dynamic) stimuli, but significantly less accurate when inferring who received Monopoly money from static (compared to dynamic) stimuli. Both groups made similar emotion attributions to each gift in both conditions (positive for chocolate, feigned positive for homemade and confused for Monopoly money). Participants with ASD only made marginally significantly fewer fixations to the eyes of the face, and face of the person than typical controls in both conditions. Results suggest adolescents and adults with ASD can distinguish subtle emotion cues for certain emotions (genuine from feigned positive) when given sufficient processing time, however, dynamic cues are informative for recognising emotion blends (e.g. smiling in confusion). This indicates difficulties processing complex emotion responses in ASD.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1002/aur.1468en_US
dc.rights(c) 2015 The Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed under the Creative Commons CC-BY licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)en_US
dc.subjectAutism spectrum disordersen_US
dc.subjectFace perceptionen_US
dc.subjectEye trackingen_US
dc.subjectSpontaneous emotion recognitionen_US
dc.subjectRetrodictive mindreadingen_US
dc.subjectSocial cognitionen_US
dc.subjectMulti-modal processingen_US
dc.subjectVisual auditory integrationen_US
dc.titleProcessing of Spontaneous Emotional Responses in Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders Effect of Stimulus Typeen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2015-02-04
dc.date.application2015-03-03
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2020-06-04T14:51:52Z
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-01T06:12:11Z


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