Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWalter, B.S.
dc.contributor.authorDeWitte, S.N.
dc.contributor.authorDupras, T.
dc.contributor.authorBeaumont, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-03T09:48:44Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-06T15:13:12Z
dc.date.available2020-04-03T09:48:44Z
dc.date.available2020-05-06T15:13:12Z
dc.date.issued2020-06
dc.identifier.citationWalter BS, DeWitte SN, Dupras T et al (2020) Assessment of nutritional stress in famine burial using stable isotope analysis. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 172(2): 214-226.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17776
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: We compared δ15N and δ13C values from bone and dentine collagen profiles of individuals interred in famine‐related and attritional burials to evaluate whether individuals in medieval London who experienced nutritional stress exhibit enriched nitrogen in bone and tooth tissue. Dentine profiles were evaluated to identify patterns that may be indicative of famine during childhood and were compared with the age of enamel hypoplasia (EH) formation to assess whether isotopic patterns of undernutrition coincide with the timing of physiological stress. Materials and Methods: δ15N and δ13C isotope ratios of bone collagen were obtained from individuals (n = 128) interred in attritional and famine burials from a medieval London cemetery (c. 1120–1539). Temporal sequences of δ15N and δ13C isotope profiles for incrementally forming dentine collagen were obtained from a subset of these individuals (n = 21). Results: Results indicate that individuals from attritional graves exhibit significantly higher δ15N values but no significant differences were found between burial types for the sexes. Analyses of dentine profiles reveal that a lower proportion of famine burials exhibit stable dentine profiles and that several exhibit a pattern of opposing covariance between δ15N and δ13C. EH were also observed to have formed during or after the opposing covariance pattern for some individuals. Conclusions: The results of this study may reflect differences in diet between burial types rather than nutritional stress. Though nutritional stress could not be definitively identified using bone and dentine collagen, the results from dentine analysis support previous observations of biochemical patterns associated with nutritional stress during childhood.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDivision of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences. Grant Numbers: BCS‐1261682, BCS‐1540208. Office of the Vice President for Research, University of South Carolina. Grant Number: SPARC Fellowship Granten_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.24054en_US
dc.rights© 2020 Wiley This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Walter BS, DeWitte SN, Dupras T et al (2020) Assessment of nutritional stress in famine burial using stable isotope analysis. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 172(2): 214-226, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.24054. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
dc.subjectmedieval London, stable isotope analysis, famine, diet, nutritional stressen_US
dc.subjectDieten_US
dc.subjectFamineen_US
dc.subjectMedieval Londonen_US
dc.subjectNutritional stressen_US
dc.subjectStable isotope analysisen_US
dc.titleAssessment of nutritional stress in famine burials using stable isotope analysisen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2020-03-16
dc.date.application2020-04-03
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.date.updated2020-04-03T08:48:50Z
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-07T10:47:05Z


Item file(s)

Thumbnail
Name:
Beaumont_AJPA.pdf
Size:
323.3Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record