Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKeen, J.
dc.contributor.authorNicklin, E.
dc.contributor.authorLong, A.
dc.contributor.authorRandell, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorWickramasekera, N.
dc.contributor.authorGates, C.
dc.contributor.authorGinn, C.
dc.contributor.authorMcGinnis, E.
dc.contributor.authorWillis, S.
dc.contributor.authorWhittle, J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-04T11:25:12Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-04T09:32:21Z
dc.date.available2020-03-04T11:25:12Z
dc.date.available2020-05-04T09:32:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-06
dc.identifier.citationKeen J, Nicklin E, Long A et al (2018) Quality and safety between ward and board: a biography of artefacts study. Health Services and Delivery Research: 6(22).en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17763
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: There have been concerns about the quality and safety of NHS hospital services since the turn of the millennium. This study investigated the progress that acute NHS hospital trusts have made in developing and using technology infrastructures to enable them to monitor quality and safety following the publication in 2013 of the second Francis report on the scandal at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust (The Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry. Chaired by Sir Robert Francis QC. Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry. HC 898. London: The Stationery Office; 2013). Methods: A telephone survey of 15 acute NHS trusts in the Yorkshire and the Humber region, and a review of board papers of all acute NHS trusts in England for January 2015, were undertaken. The telephone survey was used to identify trusts for a larger field study, which was undertaken in four acute NHS trusts between April 2015 and September 2016. The methods included the direct observation of the use of whiteboards and other technologies on two wards in each trust, an observation of board quality committees, semistructured interviews and an analysis of the quality and safety data in board papers. Published sources about national and local agencies were reviewed to identify the trust quality and safety data that these agencies accessed and used. An interview programme was also undertaken with those organisations. The Biography of Artefacts approach was used to analyse the data. Findings: The data and technology infrastructures within trusts had developed over many years. The overall design had been substantially determined by national agencies, and was geared to data processing: capturing and validating data for submission to national agencies. Trust boards had taken advantage of these data and used them to provide assurance about quality and safety. Less positively, the infrastructures were fragmented, with different technologies used to handle different quality and safety data. Real-time management systems on wards, including electronic whiteboards and mobile devices, were used and valued by nurses and other staff. The systems support the proactive management of clinical risks. These developments have occurred within a broad context, with trusts focusing on improving the quality and safety of services and publishing far more data on their performance than they did just 3 years earlier. Trust-level data suggest that quality and safety improved at all four trusts between 2013 and 2016. Our findings indicate that the technology infrastructures contributed to these improvements. There remains considerable scope to rationalise those infrastructures.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute for Health Research Health Services and Delivery Research programme.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.3310/hsdr06220en_US
dc.rights© Queen’s Printer and Controller of HMSO 2018. This work was produced by Keen et al. under the terms of a commissioning contract issued by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care. This issue may be freely reproduced for the purposes of private research and study and extracts (or indeed, the full report) may be included in professional journals provided that suitable acknowledgement is made and the reproduction is not associated with any form of advertising. Applications for commercial reproduction should be addressed to: NIHR Journals Library, National Institute for Health Research, Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre, Alpha House, University of Southampton Science Park, Southampton SO16 7NS, UK.en_US
dc.subjectQuality and safety of NHS hospital servicesen_US
dc.subjectTechnology infrastructuresen_US
dc.subjectAcute NHS hospital trustsen_US
dc.titleQuality and safety between ward and board: a biography of artefacts studyen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2018
dc.date.application2018-06-01
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2020-03-04T11:25:14Z
refterms.dateFOA2020-05-04T09:34:25Z


Item file(s)

Thumbnail
Name:
Randell_HSDR_2018.pdf
Size:
3.286Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record