Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorConner, M.
dc.contributor.authorMcEachan, R.
dc.contributor.authorLawton, R.
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Peter H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-20T17:37:46Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-06T10:19:09Z
dc.date.available2020-02-20T17:37:46Z
dc.date.available2020-03-06T10:19:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.identifier.citationConner M, McEachan R, Lawton R et al (2017) Applying the reasoned action approach to understanding health protection and health risk behaviors. Social Science and Medicine. 195: 140-148.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17679
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractRationale: The Reasoned Action Approach (RAA) developed out of the Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior but has not yet been widely applied to understanding health behaviors. The present research employed the RAA in a prospective design to test predictions of intention and action for groups of protection and risk behaviors separately in the same sample. Objective: To test the RAA for health protection and risk behaviors. Method: Measures of RAA components plus past behavior were taken in relation to eight protection and six risk behaviors in 385 adults. Self-reported behavior was assessed one month later. Results: Multi-level modelling showed instrumental attitude, experiential attitude, descriptive norms, capacity and past behavior were significant positive predictors of intentions to engage in protection or risk behaviors. Injunctive norms were only significant predictors of intention in protection behaviors. Autonomy was a significant positive predictor of intentions in protection behaviors and a negative predictor in risk behaviors (the latter relationship became non-significant when controlling for past behavior). Multi-level modelling showed that intention, capacity, and past behavior were significant positive predictors of action for both protection and risk behaviors. Experiential attitude and descriptive norm were additional significant positive predictors of risk behaviors. Conclusion: The RAA has utility in predicting both protection and risk health behaviors although the power of predictors may vary across these types of health behavior.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipData collection for this research was funded by a grant from the British Academy to the first three authors.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.10.022en_US
dc.rights© 2017 Elsevier. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 licenseen_US
dc.subjectReasoned action approachen_US
dc.subjectTheory of planned behavioren_US
dc.subjectHealth behavioren_US
dc.subjectProtection behaviorsen_US
dc.subjectRisk behaviorsen_US
dc.titleApplying the reasoned action approach to understanding health protection and health risk behaviorsen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2017-10-20
dc.date.application2017-10-22
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.date.updated2020-02-20T17:37:46Z
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-06T10:22:22Z


Item file(s)

Thumbnail
Name:
Gardner_P_2017.pdf
Size:
283.1Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Keep suppressed - publisher's ...
Thumbnail
Name:
Gardner_P_Accepted_Manuscript.pdf
Size:
991.6Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record