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dc.contributor.authorBroadley, David
dc.contributor.authorMcElwee, Kevin J.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-05T12:05:15Z
dc.date.available2020-03-05T12:05:15Z
dc.date.issued2020-03
dc.identifier.citationBroadley DP and McElwee KJ (2020) A "hair-raising" history of alopecia areata. Experimental Dermatology. 29(3): 208-222.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17672
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractA 3500‐year‐old papyrus from ancient Egypt provides a list of treatments for many diseases including “bite hair loss,” most likely alopecia areata (AA). The treatment of AA remained largely unchanged for over 1500 years. In 30 CE, Celsus described AA presenting as scalp alopecia in spots or the “windings of a snake” and suggested treatment with caustic compounds and scarification. The first “modern” description of AA came in 1813, though treatment still largely employed caustic agents. From the mid‐19th century onwards, various hypotheses of AA development were put forward including infectious microbes (1843), nerve defects (1858), physical trauma and psychological stress (1881), focal inflammation (1891), diseased teeth (1902), toxins (1912) and endocrine disorders (1913). The 1950s brought new treatment developments with the first use of corticosteroid compounds (1952), and the first suggestion that AA was an autoimmune disease (1958). Research progressively shifted towards identifying hair follicle‐specific autoantibodies (1995). The potential role of lymphocytes in AA was made implicit with immunohistological studies (1980s). However, studies confirming their functional role were not published until the development of rodent models (1990s). Genetic studies, particularly genome‐wide association studies, have now come to the forefront and open up a new era of AA investigation (2000s). Today, AA research is actively focused on genetics, the microbiome, dietary modulators, the role of atopy, immune cell types in AA pathogenesis, primary antigenic targets, mechanisms by which immune cells influence hair growth, and of course the development of new treatments based on these discoveries.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAlopecia UK.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights© 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Broadley D and McElwee KJ (2020) A "hair-raising" history of alopecia areata. Experimental Dermatology. 29(3): 208-222, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/exd.14073. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.en_US
dc.subjectAlopecia areataen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subjectPathogenesisen_US
dc.subjectTreatmenten_US
dc.titleA "hair-raising" history of alopecia areataen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2020-01-09
dc.date.application2020-01-20
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/exd.14073
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T12:05:15Z


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