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dc.contributor.authorKoufopoulos, J.T.
dc.contributor.authorConner, M.T.
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Peter H.
dc.contributor.authorKellar, P.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-20T17:31:55Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-05T10:47:49Z
dc.date.available2020-02-20T17:31:55Z
dc.date.available2020-03-05T10:47:49Z
dc.date.issued2016-06
dc.identifier.citationKoufopoulos JT, Conner MT, Gardner PH et al (2016) A web-based and mobile health social support intervention to promote adherence to inhaled asthma medications: randomized controlled trial. Journal of Medical Internet Research. 18(6): e122.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17669
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Online communities hold great potential as interventions for health, particularly for the management of chronic illness. The social support that online communities can provide has been associated with positive treatment outcomes, including medication adherence. There are few studies that have attempted to assess whether membership of an online community improves health outcomes using rigorous designs. Objective: Our objective was to conduct a rigorous proof-of-concept randomized controlled trial of an online community intervention for improving adherence to asthma medicine. Methods: This 9-week intervention included a sample of asthmatic adults from the United Kingdom who were prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid preventer. Participants were recruited via email and randomized to either an “online community” or “no online community” (diary) condition. After each instance of preventer use, participants (N=216) were required to report the number of doses of medication taken in a short post. Those randomized to the online community condition (n=99) could read the posts of other community members, reply, and create their own posts. Participants randomized to the no online community condition (n=117) also posted their medication use, but could not read others’ posts. The main outcome measures were self-reported medication adherence at baseline and follow-up (9 weeks postbaseline) and an objective measure of adherence to the intervention (visits to site). Results: In all, 103 participants completed the study (intervention: 37.8%, 39/99; control: 62.2%, 64/117). MANCOVA of self-reported adherence to asthma preventer medicine at follow-up was not significantly different between conditions in either intention-to-treat (P=.92) or per-protocol (P=.68) analysis. Site use was generally higher in the control compared to intervention conditions. Conclusions: Joining an online community did not improve adherence to preventer medication for asthma patients. Without the encouragement of greater community support or more componentsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by a pilot grant from the University of Leeds School of Psychology. A Fulbright Scholarship from the US-UK Fulbright Commission supported the first authoren_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.4963en_US
dc.rights©Justin T Koufopoulos, Mark T Conner, Peter H Gardner, Ian Kellar. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 13.06.2016. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on http://www.jmir.org/, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.en_US
dc.subjectInterneten_US
dc.subjectTelemedicineen_US
dc.subjectSocial supporten_US
dc.subjectAsthmaen_US
dc.subjectAdherenceen_US
dc.subjectAttritionen_US
dc.subjectEngagementen_US
dc.subjectRandomized controlled trialen_US
dc.subjectOnline communityen_US
dc.subjectSocial health networken_US
dc.titleA web-based and mobile health social support intervention to promote adherence to inhaled asthma medications: randomized controlled trialen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2016-01-04
dc.date.application2016-06-13
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2020-02-20T17:31:56Z
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-05T10:50:42Z


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