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dc.contributor.authorRountree, Lindsay C.
dc.contributor.authorMulholland, P.J.
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, R.S.
dc.contributor.authorGarway-Heath, D.F.
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, J.E.
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, T.
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-28T11:46:17Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-13T10:09:19Z
dc.date.available2020-01-28T11:46:17Z
dc.date.available2020-02-13T10:09:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-02
dc.identifier.citationRountree L, Mulholland PJ, Anderson RS et al (2018) Optimising the glaucoma signal/noise ratio by mapping changes in spatial summation with area-modulated perimetric stimuli. Scientific Reports. 8: 2172.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17630
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractIdentification of glaucomatous damage and progression by perimetry are limited by measurement and response variability. This study tested the hypothesis that the glaucoma damage signal/noise ratio is greater with stimuli varying in area, either solely, or simultaneously with contrast, than with conventional stimuli varying in contrast only (Goldmann III, GIII). Thirty glaucoma patients and 20 age-similar healthy controls were tested with the Method of Constant Stimuli (MOCS). One stimulus modulated in area (A), one modulated in contrast within Ricco’s area (CR), one modulated in both area and contrast simultaneously (AC), and the reference stimulus was a GIII, modulating in contrast. Stimuli were presented on a common platform with a common scale (energy). A three-stage protocol minimised artefactual MOCS slope bias that can occur due to differences in psychometric function sampling between conditions. Threshold difference from age-matched normal (total deviation), response variability, and signal/noise ratio were compared between stimuli. Total deviation was greater with, and response variability less dependent on defect depth with A, AC, and CR stimuli, compared with GIII. Both A and AC stimuli showed a significantly greater signal/noise ratio than the GIII, indicating that area-modulated stimuli offer benefits over the GIII for identifying early glaucoma and measuring progression.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-20480-4en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2018. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. Te images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.subjectDiagnosisen_US
dc.subjectDiagnostic markersen_US
dc.subjectRetinal diseasesen_US
dc.subjectTranslational researchen_US
dc.titleOptimising the glaucoma signal/noise ratio by mapping changes in spatial summation with area-modulated perimetric stimulien_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2018-01-18
dc.date.application2018-02-01
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2020-01-28T11:46:30Z
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-13T10:09:54Z


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