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dc.contributor.authorKendall, E.J.
dc.contributor.authorMillard, A.
dc.contributor.authorBeaumont, Julia
dc.contributor.authorGowland, R.
dc.contributor.authorGorton, Marise
dc.contributor.authorGledhill, Andrew R.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-05T12:30:16Z
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-11T11:16:28Z
dc.date.available2019-12-05T12:30:16Z
dc.date.available2019-12-11T11:16:28Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationKendall EJ, Millard A, Beaumont J et al (2020) What doesn't kill you: Early life health and nutrition in early Anglo-Saxon East Anglia. In: Gowland R and Halcrow S (Eds.) The mother-infant nexus in anthropology. Switzerland: Springer Nature. 103-123.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17528
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractEarly life is associated with high vulnerability to morbidity and mortality - risks which can be reduced in infancy and early childhood through strategically high levels of parental or alloparental investment, particularly in the case of maternal breastfeeding. Recent evidence has supported links between early-life health and care patterns and long-term population health. This growing body of research regarding the broader impacts of infant-parent interactions transcends a traditional partitioning of research into discrete life stages. It also highlights implications of childhood data for our understanding of population health and behaviour. Skeletal and environmental data indicate that the 5-7th century cemeteries at Littleport and Edix Hill (Barrington A), Cambridgeshire represent populations of similar material culture but contrasting environments and health. The high prevalence of skeletal stress markers at Littleport indicates a community coping with unusual levels of biological stress, potentially a consequence of endemic malaria present in the marshy Fen environs. In contrast, Edix Hill was an inland site which exhibited lower skeletal stress marker prevalence comparable to wider British data for the early medieval period. Early life patterns relating to diet and physiological stress at Littleport (n=5) and Edix Hill (n=8) were investigated through analyses of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes from incrementally-sampled deciduous dentine. Meaningful variation in isotopic values within and between populations was observed, and should be a focus of future interdisciplinary archaeological childhood studies.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Society for the Study of Human Biology, the Durham University Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, and by the Rosemary Cramp Fund.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-27393-4en_US
dc.rights© 2020 Springer. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The final publication is available at Springer via https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-27393-4.en_US
dc.subjectEarly life healthen_US
dc.subjectEarly life nutritionen_US
dc.subjectEarly Anglo-Saxon East Angliaen_US
dc.subjectParental investmenten_US
dc.titleWhat doesnt kill you: Early life health and nutrition in early Anglo Saxon East Angliaen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2019
dc.date.application2019-10-25
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.date.EndofEmbargo2021-11-01
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.description.publicnotesThe full-text of this article will be released for public view at the end of the publisher embargo on 01 Nov 2021.en_US
dc.date.updated2019-12-05T12:30:18Z
refterms.dateFOA2019-12-11T11:16:58Z


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