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dc.contributor.authorGhorbani Mojarrad, Neema
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, C.
dc.contributor.authorGuggenheim, J.A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-08T12:18:13Z
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-26T10:06:29Z
dc.date.available2019-11-08T12:18:13Z
dc.date.available2019-11-26T10:06:29Z
dc.date.issued2018-09
dc.identifier.citationGhorbani Mojarrad N, Williams C and Guggenheim JA (2018) A genetic risk score and number of myopic parents independently predict myopia. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics. 38(5): 492-502.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17505
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To investigate whether a genetic risk score (GRS) improved performance of predicting refractive error compared to knowing a child’s number of myopic parents (NMP) alone. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) birth cohort study. Refractive error was assessed longitudinally between age 7–15 using non-cycloplegic autorefraction. Genetic variants (n=149) associated with refractive error from a Consortium for Refractive Error And Myopia (CREAM) genome-wide association study were used to calculate a GRS for each child. Using refractive error at ages 7 and 15 years as the outcome variable, coefficient of determination (R2) values were calculated via linear regression models for the predictors: NMP, GRS and a combined model. Results: Number of myopic parents was weakly predictive of refractive error in children aged 7 years, R2=3.0% (95% CI 1.8–4.1%,p<0.0001) and aged 15 years, R2=4.8% (3.1–6.5%,p<0.0001). The GRS was also weakly predictive;age 7 years, R2=1.1% (0.4–1.9%,p<0.0001) and 15 years R2=2.6% (1.3–3.9%,p<0.0001). Combining the 2 variables gave larger R2 values at age 7, R2=3.7%(2.5–5.0%,p<0.0001) and 15, R2=7.0% (5.0–9.0%,p<0.0001). The combined model improved performance at both ages (both p<0.0001). Conclusion: A GRS improved the ability to detect children at risk of myopia independently of knowing the NMP. We speculate this may be because NMP captures information concerning environmental risk factors for myopia. Nevertheless, further gains are required to make such predictive tests worthwhile in the clinical environment.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe UK Medical Research Council and Wellcome. Grant Number: 102215/2/13/2 The University of Bristol provide core support for ALSPAC PDF. Grant Number: 459KB The College of Optometrists NIHR Senior Research Fellowship. Grant Number: SRF‐2015‐08‐005 23andMeen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1111/opo.12579en_US
dc.rights© 2018 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2018 The College of Optometrists. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Ghorbani Mojarrad N, Williams C and Guggenheim JA (2018) A genetic risk score and number of myopic parents independently predict myopia. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics. 38(5): 492-502, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/opo.12579. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.en_US
dc.subjectALSPACen_US
dc.subjectGenetic predictionen_US
dc.subjectMyopiaen_US
dc.subjectRefractive erroren_US
dc.titleA genetic risk score and number of myopic parents independently predict myopiaen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2018-07-19
dc.date.application2018-09-04
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.date.updated2019-11-08T12:18:15Z
refterms.dateFOA2019-11-26T10:07:12Z


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