Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJennings, E.
dc.contributor.authorBuckberry, Jo
dc.contributor.authorBrickley, M.B.
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-07T16:52:15Z
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-25T14:10:21Z
dc.date.available2019-11-07T16:52:15Z
dc.date.available2019-11-25T14:10:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-12
dc.identifier.citationJennings E, Buckberry J and Brickley MB (2018) Radiographically recognizable? An investigation into the appearance of osteomalacic pseudofractures. International Journal of Paleopathology. 23: 26-31.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17501
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractPseudofractures, lucent bands that occur due to a build-up of osteoid, are a key feature of osteomalacia. In paleopathology, pseudofractures are often marked by small, linear cracks in the cortex of the bone surrounded by irregular, bony spicule formation. Radiography can be used to help diagnose pseudofractures, both clinically and in paleopathology. A detailed understanding of the radiographic appearance of pseudofractures and their development is, therefore, necessary to aid a diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency. The present study examined the clinical literature to determine current ideas on the appearance of pseudofractures with the aim of applying this knowledge to paleopathology. A radiographic study of the characteristics of pseudofractures was performed on five individuals with clear skeletal features of osteomalacia from archaeological sites in Canada and the United Kingdom dating to the medieval period (5th to 15th centuries) and the 18th to 19th century. Results show that the radiographic appearance of pseudofractures could potentially reveal information about the cause of the deficiency and the chronicity of pseudofractures. This type of information has the potential to further our understanding of the lived experiences of archaeological individuals with osteomalacia.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe equipment used at McMaster University was provided by the Canada Foundation for Innovation John R. Evans Leaders Fund (CFI-JELF), Ontario Research Fund Research Infrastructure (ORF-RI) and Institutional Support from McMaster University (#29497). Financial support was also provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC CGS-M). This research was undertaken, in part, thanks to funding from the Canada Research Chairs program.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpp.2017.12.003en_US
dc.rights© 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.en_US
dc.subjectOsteomalaciaen_US
dc.subjectPseudofracturesen_US
dc.subjectLooser zonesen_US
dc.subjectRadiographyen_US
dc.titleRadiographically recognizable? An investigation into the appearance of osteomalacic pseudofracturesen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2017-12-15
dc.date.application2018-01-04
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.date.updated2019-11-07T16:52:23Z
refterms.dateFOA2019-11-25T14:10:58Z


Item file(s)

Thumbnail
Name:
RadiographicallyRecognizable_f ...
Size:
1.761Mb
Format:
Microsoft Word 2007
Description:
To keep suppressed
Thumbnail
Name:
Buckberry_IJP.pdf
Size:
378.7Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record