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dc.contributor.authorCarstea, E.M.
dc.contributor.authorPopa, C.L.
dc.contributor.authorBaker, A.
dc.contributor.authorBridgeman, John
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-09T08:05:08Z
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T16:05:11Z
dc.date.available2019-09-09T08:05:08Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T16:05:11Z
dc.date.issued2020-01
dc.identifier.citationCarstea EM, Popa CL, Baker A et al (2020) In situ fluorescence measurements of dissolved organic matter: a review. Science of the Total Environment. 699: 134361.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17254
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractThere is a need for an inexpensive, reliable and fast monitoring tool to detect contaminants in a short time, for quick mitigation of pollution sources and site remediation, and for characterization of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM). Fluorescence spectroscopy has proven to be an excellent technique in quantifying aquatic DOM, from autochthonous, allochthonous or anthropogenic sources. This paper reviews the advances in in situ fluorescence measurements of DOM and pollutants in various water environments. Studies have demonstrated, using high temporal-frequency DOM fluorescence data, that marine autochthonous production of DOM is highly complex and that the allochthonous input of DOM from freshwater to marine water can be predicted. Furthermore, river measurement studies found a delayed fluorescence response of DOM following precipitation compared to turbidity and discharge, with various lags, depending on season, site and input of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. In addition, research has shown that blue light fluorescence (λemission = 430–500 nm) can be a good proxy for DOC, in environments with terrestrial inputs, and ultraviolet fluorescence (λemission = UVA–320–400 nm) for biochemical oxygen demand, and also E. coli in environments with sanitation issues. The correction of raw fluorescence data improves the relationship between fluorescence intensity and these parameters. This review also presents the specific steps and parameters that must be considered before and during in situ fluorescence measurement session for a harmonized qualitative and quantitative protocol. Finally, the strengths and weaknesses of the research on in situ fluorescence are identified.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAuthors, E.M. Carstea and C.L. Popa, acknowledge the support of the Ministry of Research and Innovation, CNCS-UEFISCDI, project number PN-III-P1-1.1-TE-2016-0646, within PNCDI III, project number 18N/2019, under the Core Program OPTRONICA VI, project number 19PFE/17.10.2018 and project number 152/2016, SMIS 108109.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights© 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.en_US
dc.subjectField fluorimetersen_US
dc.subjectSurface wateren_US
dc.subjectGroundwateren_US
dc.subjectEngineered water systemsen_US
dc.subjectDissolved organic matteren_US
dc.titleIn situ fluorescence measurements of dissolved organic matter: a reviewen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2019-09-07
dc.date.application2019-09-10
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.134361
dc.date.updated2019-09-09T07:05:13Z
refterms.dateFOA2019-09-25T16:05:54Z


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