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dc.contributor.advisorMacaulay, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorChirambwi, Kudakwashe
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-27T11:21:46Z
dc.date.available2019-08-27T11:21:46Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17225
dc.descriptionABSTRACT: This thesis examines policing within the context of security and development, with particular reference to ways in which the Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) operates in the wider political economy of Zimbabwean state in response to decades of financial crisis. Guided by the social constructionist philosophy and structural political economy analysis, the case study demonstrates that, through a range of commercial activities, the ZRP has been able to shift police preoccupation from ‘what is routinely important’ to ‘what works’ as part of resilience and adaptability in one of the world’s distorted economies. In cases where the police lack sufficient budget support from the government they recalibrate into self-organized systems and devise ways in which they raise the much needed revenue for policing. Using interpretive content analysis for secondary data and thematic analysis for in-depth interviews, the other finding relates to the ways in which the ZRP deploys neoliberal registers of ‘sustainable development’ and economic nationalist discourses to legitimise its involvement in commercial activities in farms, mines, tourism and social welfare businesses. Commercial activities involve distribution of wealth, power and interests. As such, what started off as productive entrepreneurship to ‘make ends meet’ slipped into unproductive and destructive entrepreneurship. The latter has made the police institution gets to a breakdown as different categories of officers split into different commercial units as they compete for access and control. To date, there is little literature that foregrounds the experiences and views of the police officers on the political economy of policing and it is to this literature this thesis primarily contributes. Inadvertently, as the ZRP responds to the economic crisis, it sometimes uses violence against citizens. The violence is sometimes quite targeted and deliberate as the police use metal spiked bars to clampdown motorists in demand of bribe money. The findings suggest that the police operating in a context of budget cuts are highly unlikely to be people-oriented.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectZimbabween_US
dc.subjectPolitical economyen_US
dc.subjectEconomic crisisen_US
dc.subjectPeaceen_US
dc.subjectSecurityen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectCommercial activitiesen_US
dc.subjectZimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP)en_US
dc.titleThe political economy of policing in Zimbabwe: Changing roles, practice and identities in relationship to peace, security and developmenten_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentFaculty of Social Sciencesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.EndofEmbargo2024-07-17
dc.date.awarded2019
dc.description.publicnotesThe full text will be available at the end of the embargo, 17th July 2024en
refterms.dateFOA2019-08-27T11:21:46Z


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