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dc.contributor.authorAaen-Stockdale, Craig*
dc.contributor.authorHotchkiss, John*
dc.contributor.authorHeron, James*
dc.contributor.authorWhitaker, David J.*
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-06T11:06:34Z
dc.date.available2019-06-06T11:06:34Z
dc.date.issued2011-06-01
dc.identifier.citationAaen-Stockdale C, Hotchkiss J, Heron J et al (2011) Perceived time is spatial frequency dependent. Vision Research. 51(11): 1232-1238.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17111
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractWe investigated whether changes in low-level image characteristics, in this case spatial frequency, were capable of generating a well-known expansion in the perceived duration of an infrequent “oddball” stimulus relative to a repeatedly-presented “standard” stimulus. Our standard and oddball stimuli were Gabor patches that differed from each other in spatial frequency by two octaves. All stimuli were equated for visibility. Rather than the expected “subjective time expansion” found in previous studies, we obtained an equal and opposite expansion or contraction of perceived time dependent upon the spatial frequency relationship of the standard and oddball stimulus. Subsequent experiments using equi-visible stimuli reveal that mid-range spatial frequencies (ca. 2 c/deg) are consistently perceived as having longer durations than low (0.5 c/deg) or high (8 c/deg) spatial frequencies, despite having the same physical duration. Rather than forming a fixed proportion of baseline duration, this bias is constant in additive terms and implicates systematic variations in visual persistence across spatial frequency. Our results have implications for the widely cited finding that auditory stimuli are judged to be longer in duration than visual stimuli.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWellcome Trust, UK, the Federation of Ophthalmic and Dispensing Opticians, UK, and the College of Optometrists, UK.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2011.03.019en_US
dc.rights(c) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Open access under CC BY license.en_US
dc.subjectTime perceptionen_US
dc.subjectSpatial frequencyen_US
dc.subjectDurationen_US
dc.subjectOddballen_US
dc.subjectSubjective timeen_US
dc.titlePerceived time is spatial frequency dependenten_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-06T11:06:34Z


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