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dc.contributor.authorMartyr, A.*
dc.contributor.authorNelis, S.M.*
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Catherine*
dc.contributor.authorRusted, J.M.*
dc.contributor.authorMorris, R.G.*
dc.contributor.authorClare, L.*
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-23T13:39:55Z
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-04T14:16:46Z
dc.date.available2019-05-23T13:39:55Z
dc.date.available2019-06-04T14:16:46Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationMartyr A, Nelis SM, Quinn C, Rusted JM, Morris RG and Clare L (2019) The relationship between perceived functional difficulties and the ability to live well with mild-to-moderate dementia: Findings from the IDEAL programme. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Accepted for publication.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/17107
dc.descriptionyesen_US
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The objectives of the study are to investigate how different levels of functional ability relate to quality of life, well‐being, and satisfaction with life, conceptualised as reflecting capability to “live well” in people with dementia. Methods/design: Participants were 1496 people with mild‐to‐moderate dementia and 1188 informants who completed baseline assessments in the Improving the experience of Dementia and Enhancing Active Life (IDEAL) cohort study. Total selfrated and informant‐rated scores on the Functional Activities Questionnaire were split into six ability levels to monitor how poorer functioning impacts the ability to live well. We also investigated the potential influence of sociodemographic and diagnostic variables, depression, cognition, and carer stress. Results: Multivariate multiple regression models found that people with dementia who had the greatest functional impairment according to self‐ratings and informant ratings had poorer living well scores than those with the least functional impairment. Sociodemographic and diagnostic factors and cognition had little impact on effect sizes. For self‐ratings, depression attenuated the relationship between functional ability and living well, whereas carer stress attenuated informant ratings. Conclusions: People with dementia with the least functional impairments had greater capability to live well than those with the most functional impairment. Even subtle perceived difficulties in functional ability had a detrimental effect on the ability of people with dementia to live well. Depression in people with dementia and carer stress in informants influenced these associations, and therefore, these factors should be routinely included in future research studies and clinical assessments.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1002/gps.5128en_US
dc.rights© 2019 The Authors. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.subjectActivitiesen_US
dc.subjectDaily livingen_US
dc.subjectAlzheimer's diseaseen_US
dc.subjectCarer stressen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectFunctional abilityen_US
dc.subjectFunctional impairmenten_US
dc.titleThe relationship between perceived functional difficulties and the ability to live well with mild-to-moderate dementia: Findings from the IDEAL programme.en_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2019-04-19
dc.date.application2019-05-20
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionPublished versionen_US
dc.date.updated2019-05-23T13:40:01Z
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-04T14:29:18Z


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